consumerism

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consumerism

an organized movement to protect the interests of CONSUMERS by forcing companies to behave in a more socially responsible manner. The movement developed in response to the increasing technical complexity of products, the growing power of big businesses and environmental pollution. In many countries there are now consumer bodies, such as the Consumer Association in the UK, which provide product-testing facilities and publish comparative information on products through magazines such as Which. See GREEN CONSUMER.

consumerism

an organized movement to protect the economic interests of CONSUMERS. The movement developed in response to the growing market power of large companies and the increasing technical complexity of products. It embraces bodies such as the Consumers’ Association in the UK, which is concerned with product testing and informing consumers through publications such as Which? Consumerism has been officially incorporated into British COMPETITION POLICY since the 1973 FAIR TRADING ACT. See CONSUMER PROTECTION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chapters 3 through 5 continue to extend the discussion on Chinese advertising and consumer culture by presenting vivid case studies and local firms' stories.
Few studies, however, have examined African consumerism or the ways in which the creation of African consumer cultures was more than a byproduct of colonial or global capitalism.
China's consumer culture has attracted worldwide attention in recent years because of its rapid development.
The pleasures that we seek in our modern age are manufactured as goods that consumer culture promotes.
Given that finding similarities between cultures is an important aspect to further define global products (Akaka & Alden, 2010; Alden et al., 1999; Dawar and Parker, 1994; Guo, 2013), this article proposes a model to characterize and verify the impact of latent traits to the susceptibility to global consumer culture (SGCC) of global consumers in acquiring global brands.
What marked the consumer culture that emerged in the late nineteenth century as modern was mass marketing and mass consumption.
Iskin's study explores the complex ways in which painters like Caillebotte, Degas, Cassatt and many others engaged with and were deeply influenced by consumer culture, as she deftly resituates many of these familiar paintings in their initial visual context.
[3] Echoing countless social critics who bemoan the emasculating effects of consumer culture on once self-defined and autonomous individuals, Fight Club clearly delineates the lure of commodities and the false promises of a therapeutic individualism.
That I would not engage in conversation a man who understood the emerging consumer culture and over four decades produced profitable magazines might seem odd.
On the contrary, there is a growing recognition that this choice to leave the pressures of consumer culture behind is both personally liberating and economically sound.
Pugh's ethnography of childhood consumer culture focused on three school sites: a low-income after-school program, an affluent public school, and an affluent private school.
Commerce in Color: Race, Consumer Culture, and American Literature, 1893-1933.

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