consortium

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Consortium

A group of companies that cooperate and share resources in order to achieve a common objective.
Copyright © 2012, Campbell R. Harvey. All Rights Reserved.

Consortium

A group of independent companies participating in a joint venture for mutual benefit. Companies in a consortium cooperate with one another, often sharing technology as needed. A consortium allows the companies to conduct operations that they would not be able to do individually. It is important to note, however, that a consortium is not a merger and the companies remain independent.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

consortium

A group of organizations that participate in a joint venture. Airbus Industrie, a European airplane manufacturer, is a consortium of four public and private corporations in Britain, France, Spain, and Germany.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.

consortium

a group of independent companies or financial institutions which agree to work together jointly on some undertaking, for example the construction of an electricity power plant or the provision of a range of financial services, each contributing some particular resource input or expertise. In recent years, many TAKEOVERS of companies have been arranged on a consortium basis, with a view to breaking up the target company and sharing out its assets between the individual participants in the consortium. See CONTRACTOR.
Collins Dictionary of Business, 3rd ed. © 2002, 2005 C Pass, B Lowes, A Pendleton, L Chadwick, D O’Reilly and M Afferson

consortium

a temporary grouping of independent firms, organizations and governments brought together to pool their resources and skills in order to undertake a particular project such as a major construction programme or the building of an aircraft, or to combine their buying power in bulk-buying factor inputs.
Collins Dictionary of Economics, 4th ed. © C. Pass, B. Lowes, L. Davies 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
(23) We analyzed these results in the aggregate, looking at subjects by total consortial usage.
Currently, at Texas State University, we are part of a Texas-wide university effort championed by the Texas Digital Library (TDL) to implement a statewide consortial data repository based on Harvard University's open source solution, Dataverse.
Two separate articles in the book discuss consortial virtual reference services: One uses text messaging, and the other uses web-based chat.
This inflexible, potentially very insecure system is especially convoluted (and risky) for consortial subscriptions.
Since we are committed to our consortial chat service, LibAnswers 2 would have put us in the position of paying for features we would not use.
By the time the contract is due to be renewed, there may be new prices, new content, new participants on both sides--e.g., new corporate ownership of the publishing entity, new consortial combinations among the reader community.
Robinson; (5) "Consortial Approaches to International Education," by John J.
In October 2012, PALCI convened a five-member Ebooks Task Force (EBTF) to explore the feasibility of developing a consortial DDA program with 69 member institutions, including small private liberal arts schools, medium-size state universities, and large research focused institutions, with FTEs ranging from 300-85,000.
If a library has a Friends program, special connections to alumni, or consortial patrons, then licenses should facilitate access.
Among others, they are price, consortial discounts, search engines, accessibility, content, current usefulness, and lasting benefit.