Confidence level

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Confidence level

In risk analysis, the degree of assurance that a specified failure rate is not exceeded.

Confidence Level

In polling and statistics, the degree of certainty in the confidence interval. The confidence level is how likely a pollster or statistician believes the results of a poll are repeatable and non-random. This is expressed as a percentage. For example, if a poll finds that 48% of those polled intend to vote for Candidate A with a 3% confidence interval and a 95% confidence level, this means that the pollster is 95% certain that between 45% and 51% of the population at large will vote for Candidate A.
References in periodicals archive ?
The objective of this study was to determine the confidence level of house officers in performing root canal treatment.
Median post-course confidence level ranks for all the skills were higher (p<0.05).
When compared to other regions, business travelers outside the US have lower confidence levels and are far less optimistic about the use of technology overall.
The confidence level stood at 53.1 in July- to- September quarter and 51.5 in the quarter before that.
The confidence levels of the mean probability risk model are calculated using the parameters [[beta].sub.u], which is usually in a range from 0.1 to 0.6, and [A.sub.R], which is usually in a range from 1.5 to 6.
"The confidence level going up has to do with the government's ability to pass the GST.
The combination of these positive and negative forces are keeping Northern Ireland's consumer confidence levels more or less static."
Boost the country's confidence levels and we will solve so many of Britain's ills."
Onan Excel spreadsheet, the orange and light-orange shades indicateperiods when contentshowed low encoding confidence levels on Voltair, according to Telos.
According to John Loos, Household and Property Sector Strategist at FNB, strong headwinds--in the form of higher personal income taxes, poor job creation, frequent power outages, drought conditions in large parts of the country, rising interest rates and an alarming depreciation in the rand exchange rate--have been battering household income growth and consumer confidence levels since the beginning of the year.
This article reviews a traditional statistical technique of estimating confidence levels from a normal distribution and proposes a method for appraisers to measure and report confidence levels.
Confidence levels were much worse a little over a year ago, when the index - which is set to a 1985 benchmark of 100 - stood at 58.6.