cell

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cell

an independent team of operatives who work together in a CELLULAR MANUFACTURING production environment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The transcription factor Nr2e3 functions in retinal progenitors to suppress cone cell generation.
Like several other types of retinal neurons, cone cells develop into what is known as a "mosaic" because there is a degree of regular spacing between the cone cells of specific type, for example, red cones.
[18] Mhairi Skinner (2009) Tumorigenesis: Cone cells set the stage.
L and S cone cells acting together can produce a pinky-purple colour called magenta.
In ten of the 17 species, no cone cells were observed.
For example, Gegenfurtner knew of a color-blind man lacking all three types of cone cells who complained of trouble catching a Frisbee.
Cone cells come in red, blue, and green types, the names indicating their color sensitivities.
The activation of a current upon the removal of illumination (known as an off-current) seen here in the urchin tube feet disc cells has some similarities with the vertebrate light detection system found in rod and cone cells, in which the absorption of light leads to an enzyme cascade that results in the turning off of a constitutive dark current (Takemoto and Cunnick, 1990).
Achromatopsia (ACHM; OMIM 216900) is an autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy affecting cone cells, characterised by photophobia, decreased visual acuity, nystagmus and colour blindness.1 ACHM occurs in complete and incomplete forms based on inability to distinguish colours.
These cells contain pigments sensitive to three portions of the visible spectrum, and are usually known as S cone cells (short wavelength, responsible for perceiving blue), M cone cells (medium wavelength, green), and L cone cells (long wavelength, red).
Science into Practice--Your eyes have a retina, a layer of neurons connected to photosensitive rod and cone cells. Rods detect images in dim light, and cones detect colors.
The cone cells in the retina work best in bright light and help us read, see detail and recognise colours.