condemnor


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Related to condemnor: condemner

condemnor

One who condemns property.

References in periodicals archive ?
Courts across the United States have held that the proper consideration in assessing damages is the rights acquired, not what the condemnor intends to do with those rights.
As noted, some states permit the condemnor to take possession of the property upon depositing funds in the amount of the taking while litigation continues.
86) States that have recognized condemnation blight, such as Florida, expressly relied upon this policy: "[Determining compensation at the depressed value] would permit a condemnor to depreciate [the] property values by a threat of condemnation then take advantage of the depressed value which results by paying the landowner the depreciated value.
Also, working with the condemnor early in the process can help to significantly reduce the negative impacts of the taking.
29) In Illinois, for example, a condemnor may file a petition
indispensability, and strict scrutiny would require a condemnor to show
2002) (observing that standard quick-take procedures require a condemnor to file a "declaration of taking" and a deposit of the appraised fair market value); Nicole Stelle Garnett, The Public-Use Question as a Takings Problem, 71 GEO.
4) This act created new protections for landowners, including a requirement that the would-be condemnor must attempt to purchase the land from the would-be condemnee engaging in "good faith negotiation" before filing a condemnation action.
This reasoning, however, fails to recognize that "quick-take" is the automatic vesting of title in the condemnor after certain procedural steps have been taken.
915 DEFRANCISCO Establishes eminent domain shall only be used for public projects; establishes after any industrial development agency approves the use of eminent domain, the county legislature or the New York city council shall vote to determine whether or not to condemn such property; establishes a condemnor shall reimburse a condemnee any relocation costs.
A taking of such property is permitted if the condemnor acquires title to ninety percent of the economic development area and "the legislative body for the condemnor" authorizes the condemnation by a two-thirds vote.
179) As a California appellate court recently observed, "one would expect a prudent condemnor to offer its best estimate of fair market value plus some reflection of its own savings from avoiding trial, with a further upward adjustment for elimination of potential liability for the condemnee's litigation expenses.