condemnee

condemnee

One whose property is condemned.

References in periodicals archive ?
To give a condemnee less would be to deny him the right guaranteed to him by the constitution.
section] 511 ("If a condemnee fails to file a claim within the one hundred twenty day period, his claim shall thereafter be tried upon the proof presented.
In Texas, a condemnee cannot be compensated for reduced access to the land; therefore, testimony on that issue would have been irrelevant.
Although the condemnee eventually recovered the fees and expenses, very few private landowners are able to take on such a formidable price or time-consuming effort to protect their land.
concurring) ("Reversal of an erroneous conviction on appeal or on habeas, or the pardoning of an innocent condemnee through executive clemency, demonstrates not the failure of the system but its success.
Eminent Domain [section] 351 (2011) (stating that, in eminent domain proceedings, the "burden of showing the value of the taking or the damages which the landowner or condemnee will suffer rests on the landowner").
The mirror-image quality of the Calabresi & Melamed taxonomy makes this interpretation equally valid as the one in the text; in that case, however, there would still be a shadow Rule 2 in which the would-be condemnee (who is made to stop the use upon the government's payment) would himself be able to continue the use (that is stop the condemnation) upon paying.
In a condemnation, for example, the condemnee could disingenuously conjure up insincere offers by the owner condemnee's friends or relatives, who have no intention of buying, in an effort to boost the appearance of demand and property value.
Real eminent-domain reform will only occur when Americans rethink the Norman roots of property holding and revive the jury s power to interpose between the condemnor and condemnee.
37) In either case, the condemnee who suffers the effects of condemnation blight is entitled to compensation.
Likewise, uncompensated losses arising from pretextual condemnation might engender a heightened sense of injury in the condemnee, who would ascribe his injury to predation rather than to the random chance of government necessity.
91) Justice Scalia wrote in another case that the "[r]eversal of an erroneous conviction on appeal or on habeas, or the pardoning of an innocent condemnee through executive clemency, demonstrates not the failure of the system but its success.