growth

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Growth

The change in a company's or nation's earnings, revenue, GDP or some other measure from one period of time (usually a year) to the next. Growth shows by how much the measure has grown or shrunk in raw dollar amounts, but may be expressed as a percentage as well. It may or may not be adjusted for inflation.

Growth.

Growth is an increase in the value of an investment over time. Unlike investments that produce income, those that are designed for growth don't necessarily provide you with a regular source of cash.

A growth company is more likely to reinvest its profits to build its business. If the company prospers, however, its stock typically increases in value.

Stocks, stock mutual funds, and real estate may all be classified as growth investments, but some stocks and mutual funds emphasize growth more than others.

growth

see ECONOMIC GROWTH.

growth

see ECONOMIC GROWTH.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, in the recent years, global gene expression patterns and genes required in compensatory growth caused by genetic mechanism have been determined and identified separately (He et al.
Compensatory growth responses in juvenile fat snook, Centropomus parallelus Poey, following food deprivation.
The relationship between feed restriction at an early age and the occurrence of compensatory growth in light hybrid chickens.
However, no previous studies have correlated stocking densities and compensatory growth in penaeid shrimp in combination with the possible benefits of biofloc culture during the nursery phase.
Feed quality restriction and compensatory growth in growing sheep: development of body organs.
Wilson PN and DF Osbourne Compensatory growth after undernutrition in mammals and birds.
As compensatory growth invariably decreases over time - with the maximum effect over the first month - knowing when to stop feeding is crucial.
All of the examples of plant compensatory growth that we have documented (see Figure 2) exceed (sometimes by one or two orders of magnitude) the size ranges described for the species in dichotomous keys.
Compensatory growth is referred to as the accelerated weight gain following a period of reduced nutrient intake during early development (Barker et al.

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