company union


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company union

a TRADE UNION which is in effect run by the management of a company and which is intended to defuse employee grievances or wage demands. As such it cannot be considered to be a genuine union, and would therefore find it difficult to secure a certificate of independence from the CERTIFICATION OFFICER, and hence would be denied the benefits unions usually obtain as FRIENDLY SOCIETIES. See STAFF ASSOCIATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
William Leiserson's observations of the company union movement during the 1920s led him to conclude that semi-skilled workers had obtained more "out of employee representation plans than they have out of the organized labor movement.
Management even went so far as to justify the existence of the company union to stockholders on precisely these terms: "The Assembly Plan has also had the effect of making fore-men more careful and liberal in their actions and decisions as they come in contact with the workmen from day to day.
What Hirsch finds is a complicated picture in which employee aspirations often fell victim to clever company policies of dividing labor by skill, race, and gender--and appealing to workers through welfare programs and company unions.
United Teachers-Los Angeles has become a company union.
The broadly written prohibition was effective, and employer-run unions became virtually extinct by the 1950s, Today, however, this section of the NLRA is being used to brand employer-employee cooperation meetings as illegal company unions.
The editors open by relating the various chapters to current debates over the relative merits of company unions, independent unions, works councils, and employer-initiated involvement programs for providing a greater degree of employee representation in the United States.
In some instances, workers rescinded their affiliation with their craft organization to join company unions.
The documents, released hours before Wednesday night's debate between Clinton and Bob Dole, the Republican candidate, include an 11-page commitment from the authoritarian government of President Suharto to cease using the Indonesian military to break up industrial disputes and to allow workers to organize into independent company unions.