company

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Company

A proprietorship, partnership, corporation, or other form of enterprise that engages in business.

Company

Any organization that engages in business. There are many different structures a company can have, depending primarily on tax considerations and the type of business it does. Among some of the more prominent examples are a sole proprietorship, where an individual works on his/her own and all income is reported as personal income; a partnership, where two or more people create an organization partially distinct from each and where each partner has his/her own role; and a corporation, which is separate and distinct from its owners and is often a legally recognized person. See also: Limited liability company, Publicly-traded company.

company

see JOINT-STOCK COMPANY.

company

see FIRM.
References in periodicals archive ?
the risks of lack of diversification may not be worth the potential gain." And all companies permit management to sell some stock for a variety of reasons, including diversification.
Barnes' investigations that summer led to the dissolution of six fire insurance companies and to the adoption by Comptroller James Cook of an annual statement "blank" for fire companies, which required each company to provide a detailed description of mortgaged premises, their value, and even the amount of insurance carried on the buildings.
Benchmarking can be done against other companies within an industry, as well as across industries.
Even more daunting is that with larger companies competing, many will have to change their approaches to remain competitive.
Another significant barrier was the prevention of companies from using their assets, such as unlisted stock, to purchase another company unless they went through a tedious and often unfavorable court valuation process.
Accelerating the process can help companies identify and correct errors before they file their SEC reports.
The National Association of Mutual Insurance Companies sees growth in both membership and share of the property/casualty market written by its members.
Other recommendations go beyond what is included in the federal securities laws and would apply to all companies, including those subject to the federal securities laws.
We pored over information provided by the companies and their employees, and we were aided by the Human Rights Campaign's 2005 Corporate Equality Index, which was released in September.
That's why we've spent the better part of the past year putting together the BLACK ENTERPRISE 30 Best Companies for Diversity list.
It's a concept that enables companies to have the best of both worlds.

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