communism


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Related to communism: Karl Marx

communism

a political and economic doctrine that advocates that the state should own all property and organize all the functions of PRODUCTION and EXCHANGE, including LABOUR. Karl MARX succinctly stated his idea of communism as ‘from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs’. Communism involves a CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMY where strategic decisions concerning production and distribution are taken by government as opposed to being determined by the PRICE SYSTEM, as in a market-based PRIVATE ENTERPRISE ECONOMY. China still organizes its economy along communist lines, but in recent years Russia and other former Soviet Union countries and various East European countries have moved away from communism to more market-based economies.
References in periodicals archive ?
In post-WWII, Communism was at the center of the political opposition.
This year, high school students Chicago will likely learn more about Communism than students in Shanghai: The new world-history textbooks just introduced in China's biggest city have dropped Communist revolutions and socialist theory in favor of colorful tutorials on economics, technology, and globalization.
In the Czech Republic today, the memory of communism and its victims is not what it was when I visited Prague for the first time in 1990, only months after the Velvet Revolution.
Zeinert, Karen, McCarthy and the Fear of Communism in American History (Enslow Publishers, 1998).
Inspired by nationalist movements such as the Irish Republican Brotherhood and by the growth of communism, the ABB's aims included "Absolute Race Equality .
Jozsef Palinkas, a former Hungarian government education minister, said the use of the red star was an insult to Hungarians who fought communism.
When Reagan predicted - nearly a decade before the fall of the Berlin Wall - that communism would eventually crumble under its own weight, they laughed.
The recent BBC miniseries Cambridge Spies tells the kind of story you'd never believe if it weren't true: Four blue-blooded and well-connected graduates of Cambridge, led by their hatred of Hitler and their idealism about communism, become spies for the USSR in the 1930s.
First, given his enormous achievements as a scholar, in what ways did his communism contribute?
What is just as important, he never forgot that many members of the high bourgeoisie, men and women who had every reason to fear communism, were also prepared to welcome the Red Army; like Lukacs, they were more anti-German than anti-Russian or anti-communist.
Douglas's ghosts are shadows of a future that never came to pass: the economic and social redemption promised by modernism; the end to alienation foretold by communism.