Close

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Close

The close is the period at the end of the trading session. Sometimes used to refer to closing price. Related: Opening.

Close

1. The end of a trading day on an exchange.

2. The final price of a security at the end of a trading day. It is also called the closing price.

close

1. The end of a session of trading.
2. The last price at which a security trades during a trading session. The last price is reported in the financial media and is of particular importance to the valuation of investment portfolios. Also called closing price, last.
References in periodicals archive ?
No other foreign policy analyst even comes close to Golitsyn's level of accuracy and depth of analysis.
for example, are repeated so noisily and so frequently that the audience comes close to shouting out loud along with the actors.
It's not quite Hillary Duff doing Metamorphosis, but Hawk's meat promo comes close to the high art of Target's cheesy TV skate commercials.
PA9T provides an excellent fuel barrier that exceeds the performance of nylons 6 and 12 by a factor of 10 and comes close to levels for ETFE fluoropolymer.
Williams comes close to that balance in only a few pieces: "1987" and "Our Father.
Bejart has always preferred that his heroines be passionate, characters with an emphasis that at times comes close to melodramatic.
One reason has to do with the contrary movements of Wiegman's final chapter, in which she comes close to arguing that we must not reinscribe black women into the modern economy of visibility, then comes close to acknowledging that this argument entails the position that we need not concern ourselves with whether black women occupy positions of power (whether in university faculties, corporate boardrooms, or elected offices), then tacks back and argues that "I am not saying that the project of reconstructing Western knowledges about minoritized people is not an important, indeed vital, aspect of cultural struggle," before concluding the book with a reading of Uncle Tom's Cabin.
enemies' list comes close to acquiring a clear weapon, apoplexy breaks out in Washington, quickly followed by chest-thumping for a pre-emptive strike.
Elaine Brown's almost tell-all memoir, A Taste of Power: A Black Woman's Story, though tedious at times, comes close to the best.
Indeed, Rubenstein comes close to an "Officer Krupke" argument ("I'm depraved on account of I'm deprived"): It's really the fault of society if people become terrorists.