collectivism

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Collectivism

Any political or economic system that centralizes the means of production at the expense of individual ownership. Collectivism is associated with socialism, which advocates state ownership of resources. However, collectivism may exist in capitalist systems if corporations own most or all of the means of production.

collectivism

the philosophy that society is composed of groups or classes of people, each with its own interests, and that social CONFLICT stems largely from conflicts of interest between them. To achieve general wellbeing, policy makers should seek to balance group interests. Political action to advance the claims of disadvantaged groups and to regulate the actions of individuals is generally viewed as desirable by those subscribing to this philosophy TRADE UNIONS are often viewed as vehicles of collectivism in that they represent and advance group interests. Critics of this philosophy argue that it subsumes the unique interests of each individual. See INDIVIDUALISM.

collectivism

see CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, in regard to collectivistic values that emphasize one's performance matching up with familial standards and needs (Wang, Fu, & Rice, 2012), career counselors may consider ways to enhance students' extrinsic motivation, such as stressing external rewards earned through overcoming a task.
As they adjust to life in the United States, they are faced with postmigration stressors in the loss of their social supports, the clash between their collectivistic culture of origin and the individualistic host culture, and the discriminatory attitudes held by the larger society.
H1a: The use of individual reviews (triggering a quality-motivated bandwagon) is expected to be more prevalent among individuals with collectivistic cultural orientations, whereas the use of aggregate user information, representing more focused information (triggering a quantity-motivated bandwagon), is expected to be more prevalent among individuals of individualistic cultures.
So, far, the literature indicates a need for further consideration of the interpersonal aspects of depression while working with patients of collectivistic origins.
There is evidence that motivation for cooperation differs between individualistic and collectivistic contexts.
The correlation coefficients indicated that managers with collectivistic orientations were found less satisfied as compared to those with individualistic orientations.
Cross-culturally, persons in individualistic cultures tend to disclose more accurate information on personal profiles than those in collectivistic cultures [28, 40].
Pakistan is politically and economically less stable and has social structures that are more collectivistic in nature than Turkey.
For example, Internet users from collectivistic societies, such as China and India, expect Web sites to emphasize family themes and in-group consciousness in the form of visuals showing family bonding, togetherness, and symbols of national identity.
One of the biggest questions about the structure of affect is whether the structure found in individualistic cultures can be replicated in collectivistic cultures (Rodriguez & Church 2003).
In collectivistic cultures such as the Tunisian culture (Hofstede, 2001), the traditional family is socially central (Camillieri, 1967).