ERM

(redirected from cold)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to cold: cold war, cold treatment, Cold sores

ERM

Exchange Rate Mechanism

Used prior to the adoption of the euro, a method for reconciling differing exchange rates between currencies, allowing participation in the single European currency. Established in 1979, it was known as a "semi-pegged" system in which currencies were variable with respect to each other only within a certain range. After the introduction of the euro in 1999, the exchange rate mechanism was replaced by ERM II, which reconciles exchange rates for countries wishing to join the eurozone.
References in classic literature ?
As a result of this, little Stanislovas conceived a terror of the cold that was almost a mania.
Emma smiled and answered"My visit was of use to the nervous part of her complaint, I hope; but not even I can charm away a sore throat; it is a most severe cold indeed.
There they were, running away into the night and the snow, seeking to find shelter from the cold.
You shall not take them off," she said, crying with cold and sorrow.
O plead with gentle words for us, And whisper tenderly Of generous love to that cold heart, And it will answer ye; And though you fade in a dreary home, Yet loving hearts will tell Of the joy and peace that you have given: Flowers, dear flowers, farewell
The cold and exposure had, together, given it a color of uniform red.
So this kind lady went to the door, intending to invite the little runaway into her comfortable parlor; for, now that the sunshine was withdrawn, the atmosphere, out of doors, was already growing very cold.
But the cold was too intense to allow us to do so, for I am convinced that at this great altitude the thermometer cannot have marked less than fourteen or fifteen degrees below freezing point.
My dear," Princess Mary entering at such a moment would say, "little Nicholas can't go out today, it's very cold.
When she opened them something very cold ran up her legs and up her arms and dropped into her heart.
But though it was not far past the middle of September, the heavy clouds and strong north-easterly wind combined to render the day extremely cold and dreary; and the journey seemed a very long one, for, as Smith observed, the roads were 'very heavy'; and certainly, his horse was very heavy too: it crawled up the hills, and crept down them, and only condescended to shake its sides in a trot where the road was at a dead level or a very gentle slope, which was rarely the case in those rugged regions; so that it was nearly one o'clock before we reached the place of our destination.
After a drink of the cold water the horse sighed, moving his strong wet lips, from the hairs of which transparent drops fell into the trough; then standing still as if in thought, he suddenly gave a loud snort.