codicil


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Codicil

An amendment or modification to a will that is not intended to displace or abolish the will. Codicils are subject to the same legal requirements as a will, such as the signatures of a certain number of witnesses. Courts sometimes have difficulty in determining whether a document is a codicil or an entirely new will, but, in general, documents dealing with only a portion of an estate are presumed to be codicils unless they specifically abolish previous wills.

codicil

A legal change made to a will.
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References in periodicals archive ?
2) Challenges were made by members of Betty's family to both the 2001 Will and the 1999 Will, and to two Codicils made in the intervening period.
But the ramifications of Rome's adopting such a codicil to the central doctrine of Christianity should not be allowed to influence the decision.
a new National Child Care strategy be developed between the federal government, the provinces and territories in the event that the provinces balk at the codicil for dedicated funds;
Besides the obvious tragedy of his untimely death, the non-witnessed codicil proved to be extraordinarily problematic for the resolution of Lane's will.
A nephew of Bernardo, mentioned in a codicil to the cardinal's will, married d'Esroureville's daughter, Margherita, in December 1481; see Von Reumont, 3.
As a useful codicil to the foregoing chapters, Wiebe deftly traces the history of the American Academy of Religion and analyzes several presidential addresses from 1953 to 1993.
A person leaving only a codicil implicitly acknowledges intestate succession for all belongings that are not left to legatees.
It's important to review your will annually, both to check for mistakes that may have been made in any codicil, or change, and to make sure that it remains up to date in terms of beneficiaries listed and other matters that express your final wishes.
Ponder those last four words: the Clinton codicil to every ethical standard, including each of the Ten Commandments.
But Kuralt's letter to Shannon did not qualify under Montana law as a valid codicil to his will, the judge said in a written opinion.
Bequeathed to Philautus' sons, nursed up with their father in England', clearly indicate the author's intention to present his romance as a sequel to the bestselling prose work of the Elizabethan-Jacobean period, and the endeavour to capitalize upon Lyly's success is further evident in the Euphuistic mode of the address `To the Gentlemen Readers', and the codicil to Euphues' will, framed as a letter to Philautus, that acts as a preface to the work.
doctrines and strategies which expressed a resolve to contain that challenge included the Truman Doctrine (1948), the Eisenhower Doctrine (1957), Kennedy's flexible response, the corollaries of limited nuclear war, counterinsurgency, the Johnson Doctrine (1865), the Nixon-Kissinger Doctrine (1969), and finally the Carter Doctrine (1980) and Reagan's codicil (1981).