co-op


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Cooperative

Any organization owned by its members. A cooperative may be a business owned by its employees and/or customers, a residential complex owned by the people who live in it, or even a bank owned by its depositors. Certain legal requirements are incumbent upon cooperatives; for example, there is often a cap on how much of their profits may be distributed. See also: Cooperative economics.

Cooperative (co-op).

A co-op is a corporation that owns a particular residential property. The shareholders are the tenants who, instead of owning an individual unit, own shares in the corporation, which gives them the right to live in that unit.

co-op

(1) Short for cooperative apartment, being a method of owning real estate in which a corporation owns a building and related facilities and persons who buy stock in the building are entitled to rent a particular unit, called a proprietary lease, at rates significantly below market rents. (2) An arrangement between two real estate agents for the sale of a property and splitting of the commission, usually as a result of one agent having the listing with the owner and another agent bringing the buyer to the closing table.

References in periodicals archive ?
Co-op Easter Chirpy Chick Cake (PS7) Bottom: Easter Cupcakes (PS1.50, 2 pack).
Related: Maryland ACA CO-OP to seek shift to for-profit status CMS posts 2017 PPACA World rules
* A $250,000 line of credit for a 39-unit co-op at 61-69 Pierrepont Street in Brooklyn, NY.
Natural Resources & Environmental Studies (MNRES, PhD) Outdoor Recreation & Conservation (BSc) Co-op
Groups in dozens of states are learning about that conflict as they prepare to submit CO-OP applications to the Center for Consumer Information and Insurance Oversight (CCIIO)--the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) arm oversees the CO-OP program.
"There have been recent developments with schools because co-ops tap straight into the healthy eating agenda.
"Specifically for minority communities and economically disadvantaged communities, co-ops are a very powerful idea because they allow us to have access," says Antonio Rosell, an urban planner at Community Design Group in Minnesota.
According to a 2004 analysis of more than 250 units by Chubb's residential appraisers, condos and co-ops on average were underinsured by nearly $125,000.
At least one mother represented each co-op on a county council of co-ops each month; another produced a regular newsletter and sometimes also headed up publicity.
"As an organization, we support the individual visions of our filmmakers, but it has been their work that has created the reputation of the Film Group--the uniqueness of their vision." Early on, the co-op realized that developing filmmaking talent required more than offering workshops and equipment; it needed to play a part all the way through the filmmaking process.
In light of this analysis, it appears that a shareholder's share of a co-op's real estate taxes is not required to be added back for AMT purposes.
The chains, says George Keller, publisher of The National Co-op Directory, are just riding the boom in natural foods sales that's buoyed the whole industry.