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Close

The close is the period at the end of the trading session. Sometimes used to refer to closing price. Related: Opening.

Close

1. The end of a trading day on an exchange.

2. The final price of a security at the end of a trading day. It is also called the closing price.

close

1. The end of a session of trading.
2. The last price at which a security trades during a trading session. The last price is reported in the financial media and is of particular importance to the valuation of investment portfolios. Also called closing price, last.
References in periodicals archive ?
Simi Valley; rodent infestation, unsanitary conditions; closed June 7-10, Sept.
4) A line of cars and trucks exits the northbound Golden State Freeway after it was closed Monday.
Point Mugu State Park Back Country also is closed until further notice.
i) a generalized closed set (briefly g closed) [12] if cl(A) [subset or equal to] U whenever A [subset or equal to] U and U is open,
Kirklees College - All sites will be closed to students AMBULANCE SERVICES Ambulance service union Unison has agreed a number of measures to provide emergency cover to protect vulnerable patients during strike day.
close in : to come or move nearer or closer <A storm closed in.
Pencoed School - closed but trips planned for July 16 will go ahead.
Bloomberg (New York) has closed "On Investing," a quarterly launched in 1999 for a controlled circulation of 550,000 financial professionals, and the Kissling Organization (Lexington, KY), a producer of information for the insurance industry, has closed "Financial Services Advisor," a bimonthly launched in 1878 that had a paid circulation of 500.
Early today, the southbound freeway lanes will be closed from midnight to 4 a.
The gain on the borrowed and sold shares was not recognized until the taxpayer closed the sale by returning identical property to the lender.
Cooling water in the closed loops is chemically treated at the initial fill to dissolve the solids and keep them in suspension, explains Theys.
More often, troubled nursing homes are sold, rather than closed, but the change of owners often affects patients negatively, and still causes an economic ripple in the community.