client

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client

a BUYER of a professional SERVICE.

client

The person to whom an agent owes duties of integrity, confidentiality, loyalty, and hard work. Contrast with customer, who is owed the duty of honesty.

References in periodicals archive ?
Consequently, the result may be less in gains for the society as a whole than as a mechanism allowing the ruling elite to target construction projects to chosen locales within the state strengthening a clientage political order as well as the interests of the regime in maintaining clientage relationships.
Even in the Highlands it was also probably weakening: Alison Cathcart argues that "by the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries blood kinship was no longer the principal organising feature of clan society but rather one of a number of factors which contributed to the formation of clannish relationships": Cathcart, Kinship and Clientage, p.
He added, Due to increase in branches network, we could attract more clientage, which would alternatively help us grow our deposits and advance base.
On the other hand, in the opening lines of Epistle 1, Horace addresses Maecenas and refers to his clientage by utilising a metaphor drawn from the career of a slave, a gladiator (1.
Such an approach will probably be costly because of the large number of likely unintended consequences (second- and third-order effects) and because the cost of clientage will be bid upwards.
Pakistan, like many other client nations in that era, was a pawn in the larger struggle between the US and USSR- the two major patrons seeking clientage in the region.
Phillips skilfully interweaves these theoretical insights with the practical realities of sixteenth-century communal life, including linkages based on clientage, patronage, kinship and marriage, legal institutions, as well as more nebulous links derived from local custom, neighbourly proximity, and friendship.
The main reasons were new clientage relationships with the Roman power that brought corresponding changes to the Arab groups already settled in imperial territory and that no group in these Near Eastern provinces during this period could remain unaffected by the degree of change that was taking place on all sides.
Scholars such as Stuart Carroll, Jonathan Dewald, Sharon Kettering, Mark Motley, Kristen Neuschel, and Guy Rowlands--to name only a handful of historians writing in English--have breathed new life into the field by investigating questions as varied as marriage, clientage networks, the role of noblewomen, military service, violence, honor, and artistic patronage.
ISLAMABAD, July 11 -- Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Engineering Development Board (EDB), Iqbal Ahmed underlined the need of evolving a monitoring system in the Board for determining priority areas for satisfying clientage.
Drawing attention to "the mixture of clientage and bribery, threats of expropriation and grants of political access and political friendship that typifies minority-majority relations on most of [the] continent" (Coovadia 2009), Coovadia dissects Indians' ability to fit between the seams of discord, irritate all sides of a conflict, and become the necessary criminal element that helps forge bonds within such 'in-between' societies.
The overclass-underclass alliance, he said, had seized on a new strategy for strengthening itself: the importation of massive underclass reinforcements via unrestricted immigration of poor, unskilled Third Worlders from regions of low civilizational achievement--people bound to end up on the elites' clientage rolls in perpetuity.