classical management theory

classical management theory

the body of theory mainly associated with French mining engineer and manager Henri Fayol (1841-1925) but also with English army Colonel Lyndall Urwick (1891-1983). Common to all members of this school was an attempt to extrapolate from their practical experiences in management roles in large organizations a set of rules about how to manage effectively and efficiently Fayol defined MANAGEMENT in terms of forecasting, planning, organizing, commanding, coordinating and controlling. To this end, management should function according to a set of principles which were valid whatever the ORGANIZATION'S environment and goals. These included the principle of UNITY OF COMMAND, a clear HIERARCHY and JOB SPECIALIZATION. Fayol's analysis could be viewed as the first attempt to generate a theory of management and can be seen as a prescriptive version of Weber's ideal type of BUREAUCRACY. Compare CONTINGENCY THEORY.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reading classical management theory and hearing the original message is somewhat like examining an old Master's painting -- copied interpretations show the excellence of the work, but only the original is a masterpiece.
In classical management theory, managing relationships was just a matter of aligning people with the correct abstract principles.
Classical management theory shows the importance of good cash management by demonstrating that money is always made at the margins.
So-called classical management theory supposedly was overtaken by other schools of thought as a "modern" management theory developed.
It was under these conditions that classical management theory and the scientific management movement established the basic principles of industrial organization that became the foundation of most modern U.