Class Warfare

(redirected from class war)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Class Warfare

In political science, the idea that social classes are perpetually in conflict for more economic and political power. For example, a corporation's management has the incentive to make the most money possible for shareholders, while unionized employees have the incentive to make the most money possible for themselves. Thus, a collective bargaining negotiation will be treated like a zero-sum game, in which one side wins and the other loses. The idea that class warfare is inevitable is not universally accepted, but it is a foundational element of communism and some forms of capitalism.
References in periodicals archive ?
At a time when capital was becoming more concentrated on a global scale, and more militant against non-owners of assets, they were declaring the class war over.
In Britain, the Labour Party, under Tony Blair, Gordon Brown, and Edward Miliband, was too coy even to mention the post-2008 intensification of the class war against the majority, leading to the rise across the Labour heartland of the U.
He wrote: "I obviously do not and did not support Class War in any way, let alone in an election.
It is the contention of this paper that Class War and Red Action developed a political identity that was in part shaped by a rejection of the cultural turn outlined above.
It feels a little like class war too and, right now, there is only one class winning.
There are probably not enough people of class left in this country to form a croquet league, let alone wage a class war.
But his son went on to found outrageous newspaper Class War in 1983, which campaigned for the overthrow of capitalism.
It was a period of industrial strife and class war among the dockside workers on whom Australia's international trade depended.
Now Palast is back with his new book, ``Armed Madhouse,'' which offers ``Dispatches from the Frontlines of the Class War.
Sorel was a civil servant who believed only class war could create lasting social change: Reflections On Violence provides an intriguing argument.
But what really impressed me in the novel was London's absolute neglect of easy moralism: the class war was a class war, not a confrontation between bad, selfish, greedy, cruel bosses and good, generous, loving, righteous workers.
He added: 'But this class war will condemn thousands of foxes to die much more painful deaths - and even to the extermination of the fox in large parts of the county.