City Hall

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City Hall

1. A building that serves as a headquarters for most or all municipal services, such as parks and public works departments. City hall is usually home to city council meetings and the office of the mayor or other executive.

2. A euphemism for municipal or local government.
References in periodicals archive ?
National Capital Region Police Office chief Director Carmelo Valmoria said policemen were deployed to "assist the DILG implementing the Ombudsman order."Valmoria said apart from the SAF men also deployed were members of the the members of the Regional Public Safety Battalion and Civil Disturbance Management from the Southern Police District armed with shields have been sent to Makati City Hall.
In an interview over DzIQ Radyo Inquirer 990 AM, Southern Police District Deputy Director for Administration Senior Superintendent Elmer Jamias said that they were ordered to exercise"super maximum tolerance" to the supporters of the embattled city leader who camped at the Makati City Hall Quadrangle.
Jamias did not confirm the exact number of cops deployed on the ground but said that it was "enough to ensure peace and order" in the City Hall.
The city has $15 million to spend on replacing City Hall. With that money, it can afford only to replace City Hall with a smaller building at the current site or undertake a partial renovation.
While it's a beautiful site with serviceable office space, it's not as centrally located as the former City Hall site.
The city needs a City Hall that has a clear, unmistakable Eugene identity, not a space that it shares with a utility that will remain the dominant presence until EWEB moves its headquarters - if indeed it ever does.
Details: For more information about the survey or the City Halls and Community Organizations Project, please contact Rodney Foxworth, Project Manager at (202) 626-3030 or e-mail: foxworth@nlc.org.
As Winston Churchill said, "We shape our buildings, and thereafter they shape us." Our city hall needs to be shaped by a communitywide discussion.
It has been said that a city hall is the `unique focal point of the everyday, ordinary experience of citizenship.' It is where democracy in its most accessible form - local government - is housed.
As a result, the serious and costly issues that our current City Hall faces are not widely known.
Add in the cost of remodeling - the city recently spent $4.4 million remodeling a Country Club Road building to serve as the city's new police headquarters - and it's hard to see how Eugene can put its new City Hall at EWEB without spending more than the available $15 million.
The city has other, more attractive options for replacing City Hall, including the replacement of the existing building with a smaller building on the current City Hall block, one that presumably could be expanded when the city can afford to do so.