churn

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Churn

To make both buy and sell orders through different brokers, usually in large quantities, to create the impression of increased interest in a security and thereby raise its price. An investor churns if he/she has a long position on the security and wishes to sell it at an artificially high price. Churning is a form of manipulation, and is illegal under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. See also: Fix.
Farlex Financial Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All Rights Reserved

churn

To trade securities very actively in a brokerage account in order to increase brokerage commissions rather than customer profits. Brokers may be tempted to churn accounts because their income is directly related to the volume of trading undertaken by customers. Churning is illegal and unethical; suspected churning should be reported to the brokerage firm's office manager. Also called burn and churn, overtrade.
Wall Street Words: An A to Z Guide to Investment Terms for Today's Investor by David L. Scott. Copyright © 2003 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
“These churns look the part,” said Sean Smith Detectamet's CEO.
Dazey churns are a hot item among collectors, so much so that innumerable replicas are now being made.
For a couple of hundred pounds you can buy machines which churn and freeze, but will still take a while to churn down fully but are a lot better than the cheaper ones.
In the few hundred years prior to the industrialization of butter making, cream was cultured before it was churned. Culturing was the consequence of the universal practice of accumulating multiple milkings before churning.
(Of course, a decade of Beancounter Bingo has churned most of those positions right out of existence, but that's another column.)
All three groups, who describe their work in the September BIO/TECHNOLOGY, say the new findings illustrate the potential of harnessing transgenic livestock to produce drugs more rapidly, more cheaply and in greater quantities than the standard "bioreactor" approach, in which vats of gene-altered bacteria or culture dishes of animal cells churn out genetically engineered drugs.
Items that have already been confirmed for the next sale include copper milk churns, butter churns, a 1947 David Brown Crop Master, a 1958 Fordson Dexter, a 1954 Diesel Nuffield and a stone roller.
The plates float on the fiery-hot mantle, the thickest layer of Earth, which churns around us like gooey taffy.
In recent years, researchers have recognized that the hydrothermal vents at the spreading ridges--where rising lava churns out new seafloor--play an important role in the exchange of chemicals and heat between the oceans and the crust (SN: 12/20&27/86, p.389).