choice

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choice

the necessity for CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMIES and PRIVATE ENTERPRISE ECONOMIES to have to choose which goods and services to produce and in what quantities, arising from the relative SCARCITY of economic resources (FACTORS OF PRODUCTION) available to produce those goods and services. See ECONOMICS, PREFERENCES.
References in periodicals archive ?
As poet John Keats once wrote about a legendary pub in London's Cheapside: "Souls of Poets dead and gone, what Elysium have ye known, happy field or mossy cavern, choicer than the Mermaid Tavern?" robin.turner@walesonline.co.uk
("Reese Witherspoon did too star in Sophie's Choicer) You can also submit your fact to be published on wikifakia.com, an encyclopedia of fake facts that Ethan says will be launching soon.
Never were choicer delicacies prepared to tempt the palate of an invalid than those which found their way to Claire's room.
Instead however of straightforward interrogatio the present case evinces the choicer variety qualified by rhetoricians as pusma: the former merely requires a "yes" or a "no", whereas pusma "speziellere Antworten erheischt" (15).
"Young professionals, seeing themselves as free agents, stay only until a choicer offer comes along.
The drive should also get the support of Alan Cumming, one of our choicer exports, who on his return to the old country to play Macbeth was not impressed with the national diet.
Enduring links: Parents' expectations and their voting adult children's gender-typed occupational choicer Educational Research and Evaluation, 12, 395-407.
"Does Health Affect Portfolio Choicer Health Economics, 19(12).
They obviously haven't heard some of Fascinating Aida's choicer numbers, including The Herpes Tango and Workmates From Hell.
He is now starting to repeat words that appeal to him, and I recognise that it would be wildly inappropriate if he began addressing the staff of his day nursery with some of the choicer expressions I use about those who speed along the narrow country roads of Northumberland with scant regard to what might be approaching them around the corner.
The Cornhill Booklet, as its co-founder and first editor, Edwin Osgood Grover wrote, would not be "as original as the 'Chap-Book,' nor so wise as 'The Bibelot,' nor so protestant as 'The Philistine.'" Its two founders promised, "'The Cornhill booklet' should be dedicated to gayety, to disseminating the choicer and little known material likely to be of interest to book lovers and friends of literature." (1d)
And could there be a choicer foil for the flat affect of Steven Baldi's painterly reproduction of a 1932 Museum of Modern Art catalogue and Liz Deschenes exhibition announcement than a neighboring, salacious, early-'70s Dorothy Iannone?