CFC

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Related to chlorofluorocarbon: global warming

CFC

Controlled Foreign Corporation

A company registered in and regulated by a foreign country that has at least 50% American ownership. Setting up a corporation in a foreign country may have tax advantages; for example, a country may encourage companies to register in it by having no corporate tax. The IRS works within the context of foreign treaties to determine how earnings from controlled foreign corporations are taxed in the United States.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chlorofluorocarbons are strong candidate for halogen bonding since multiple halogen atoms are available.
However, this practice is particularly harmful for the climate since the refrigerants released during the crushing process contain chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs).
1 of Regulation 2037/2000 EC on substances which deplete the ozone layer bans the sale of chlorofluorocarbons.
the calculated production levels for chlorofluorocarbons 11, 12, 113, 114 and 115 that Rhodia Organique Fine Ltd is authorised to produce will be reduced by 1,786 tonnes of CFC-11 CFC-12 weighted according to the ozone-depleting potential, from January 1 to December 31, 2004.
Hydrogenated chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs) could potentially be used as dispersion agents.
Finally, it indicates that authorisation to import the pumps is not a blank cheque for Johnson & Johnson to use chlorofluorocarbons in the manufacture of medical devices in the Community.
The Commission also announced, in a second Decision reached on April 19, to allow Ineos Fluor Limited (UK), Honeywell Fluorine Products Europe BV (Netherlands), Rhodia Organique Fine Ltd (UK) and Ausimont SpA (Italy) to rationalise their production of chlorofluorocarbons in accordance with Annex I of Regulation (EC) 2037/2000.
Although humanmade gases, such as chlorofluorocarbons, account for much of the stratospheric-ozone loss, production of those substances is being phased out.
The most common chemicals include chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), halons and chlorine-based solvents that have been used for more than 30 years as refrigerants, cleaning agents, spray propellants, foams and fire extinguishers.
The dangers of electromagnetic radiation, lead entering a building's water supply, asbestos, indoor air quality and chlorofluorocarbons are the issues addressed in a well thought out environmental management program.
The market is recovering from the impact of the phasing-out of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and is responding to their replacement by more ozone-friendly and also more fluorspar dependant products.
Moreover, Mabury says the team was surprised to find ozone-depleting chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and greenhouse gases known as fluorocarbons coming from the heated materials.