Chiefdom

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Chiefdom

In Sierra Leone, a political subdivision equivalent to a municipality.
References in classic literature ?
The Orange Chief had not yet entered the field, but his men were all in place.
He hastened, therefore, to let the old chief know his poverty-stricken state, and how little there was to be expected from him.
thought the chief justice; and, in the bitterness of his heart, he shook his fist at the famous hall.
This was so obviously the right thing to say for an officer of Chief Inspector Heat's reputation that it was perfectly delightful.
The chief offered him a hut, but Tarzan, from past experience of native dwellings, preferred the open air, and, further, he had plans of his own that could be better carried out if he remained beneath the tree.
They have an idea that what is not seen by others is not important, but with us the rooms we live in are our chief delight and care, and we pay no attention to outside show.
So the chief of police ordered a gallows to be erected, and sent criers to proclaim in every street in the city that a Christian was to be hanged that day for having killed a Mussulman.
A missionary found a chief and his tribe in preparation for war; -- their muskets clean and bright, and their ammunition ready.
After a time, the voice of the sovereign chief, "the Left- handed," was heard across the river, announcing that the council lodge was preparing, and inviting the white men to come over.
In attempting to express his gratification, the Chief of Police thrust out his right hand with such violence that his skin was ruptured at the arm-pit and a stream of sawdust poured from the wound.
The Buli of Gatoka, seated on his best mat, surrounded by his chief men, three busy fly-brushers at his back, deigned to receive from the hand of his herald the whale tooth presented by Ra Vatu and carried into the mountains by his cousin, Erirola.
The men of this party said and thought that what was wrong resulted chiefly from the Emperor's presence in the army with his military court and from the consequent presence there of an indefinite, conditional, and unsteady fluctuation of relations, which is in place at court but harmful in an army; that a sovereign should reign but not command the army, and that the only way out of the position would be for the Emperor and his court to leave the army; that the mere presence of the Emperor paralyzed the action of fifty thousand men required to secure his personal safety, and that the worst commander in chief if independent would be better than the very best one trammeled by the presence and authority of the monarch.