Biochemical Warfare

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Related to chemical warfare: biological warfare, mustard gas

Biochemical Warfare

The open use by a nation state of biological or chemical agents to kill, injure or incapacitate its enemy. There are numerous examples of biochemical warfare dating back thousands of years. See also: Biochemterrorism.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chemical warfare agents are designed specifically to not be detected by our senses.
None of the references to chemical warfare that appear in Pershing's 1931 memoir, My Experiences in the World War, express an opinion about it.
The impurities in a chemical warfare agent can be matched to the impurities in the precursor chemicals, which point back to the likely source.
We were able to utilise the same material used in chemical warfare suits...
Until the Convention is universal and the last stockpiles have been destroyed, our debt to the victims of chemical warfare will remain unpaid".
Professor Christine Gosden, professor of medical genetics at the University of Liverpool, will discuss chemical warfare, current risks in conflicts in the Middle East and high risks caused by toxic agents.
Though the CIA has confirmed that it was a nuclear reactor that was bombed, Syria has denied that it possesses any nuclear capacities or chemical warfare.
He said: "We have equipped ourselves with millions of protection kits against biological or chemical warfare, and a massive distribution programme for the population started today" (April 6).
The original intent of the lotion was to decontaminate skin after exposure to chemical warfare agents and T-2 toxin.
Scientists are planning to develop a coating for military vehicles that would soak up a chemical warfare agent and then decontaminate itself, and could protect those operating in or around a vehicle after a chemical attack.
A series of 15 demonstrations were carried out in 1943 to show how commodities could be salvaged after a chemical warfare attack.
The Department of Defense originally stockpiled some 4,400 tons of VX, the least volatile but most potent chemical warfare agent, which it produced at Newport Chemical Depot during the 1960s.

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