Chatter

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Chatter

Whipsaw

1. A change in a security's price quickly followed by another change in the opposite direction. For example, a security could rise $1 then quickly lose $2, or it could fall 50 cents then rise 75 cents. Whipsaws are significant risks for day traders and speculators who may lose large amounts of money in short-term trading.

2. To buy securities at a market top or to sell at a market bottom. That is, one whipsaws when one buys or sells securities at exactly the worst possible time. One whipsaws out of fear or out of misreading market signals. To whipsaw is also called to chatter.
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Guests at the Chatterbox Cafe at the University's Ramsden Building (below), organised by lecturer Andrew Clifton, senior mental health nurs-|ing expert (below right)
Our team has created a 3D avatar version of Martin which is extremely realistic and Chatterbox is a voice to voice communication method which gives specific data that is programmed in," he said.
Obviously it's helpful to tell ourselves there's a car coming and it's not safe to cross the road, or to remind ourselves to buy bread on the way home, but there are times when the chatterbox is counter-productive.
Hyman, a one-time ladies' man now married to a good-natured chatterbox (Janet Wood) to be both middleman and -- this being set before psychoanalysis was fashionable -- interpreter.
Nobody, who befriends a misfit talking parakeet named Chatterbox, or C.
UK Internet service provider BISCit announced on Monday (14 November) it has added an interactive speakerphone called the VOSky Chatterbox to its home broadband platform.
They will also be here when all this chatterbox drivel is well forgotten.
format specialist the Chatterbox Partnership, says it is essential that the two disciplines are kept completely separate.
ClearCommerce identified four distinct types of consumer from the research: the Chatterbox Consumer (31%) who prefers to buy most products over the telephone; the Close Contact Consumer (22%) who prefers to purchase products in a face-to-face environment; the Converted Consumer (25%) who is happy to buy products over the Internet without speaking to customer services or visiting a store; and the Confused Consumer (22%) who uses multiple ways to buy products, for example visiting a store before buying online and confirming the booking over the phone.
This whole thing is just so dumb," Chatterbox editor-in-chief Philip Ewing, an 18-year-old senior, told the Cincinnati Enquirer.
Circumventing altogether the debate on machine intelligence and on its certifiability via the Turing test, we brand a machine that passes the test with the sigil "Turing Chatterbox.