Charge

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Charge

The document evidencing mortgage security required by Crown Law (law derived from English law). A Fixed Charge refers to a defined set of assets and is usually registered. A Floating Charge refers to other assets which change from time to time (ie. cash, inventory, etc.), which become a Fixed Charge after a default.

Charge

1. To sell at a certain price. For example, if a grocery store sells coffee beans for $7 per pound, it is said to charge $7 per pound for coffee.

2. Informal; to buy something on credit, especially with a credit card or charge card. That is, one who uses a credit card for transactions is said to charge those transactions.
References in periodicals archive ?
Experts assess the current network of public charging stations in the country as quite satisfactory, since they enable travelling by e-car from Bratislava to Kosice via the D1 cross-country highway with enough places to re-charge.
Quick Charge 4 addresses that need by providing up to 50 percent battery charge in roughly 15 minutes or less, so you dont have to spend all day chained to your charging cable.
Although incorporating the charging applicator(s) on the EOAT offers a high degree of reliability and repeatability, it presents somewhat of a challenge for the designer of the EOAT.
Ideally, charging should occur rapidly and should put metal in the furnace only as fast as the furnace is able to melt it under full power.
Moreover, following the Supreme Court's decision in Cobb, [28] agencies should not be reluctant to engage in creative charging.
Additionally, premiums are designed to keep people charging at a certain level--with programs such as Citicorp's CitiDollars program.
Funds pay their bills, from salaries on down to office expenses, by charging a string of fees.
The price they're charging, as well as the product delivered, should teach us all a little about outrageous gouging.
Prisons extract money from their inmates by charging for court costs, imposing medical co-payments, seizing prisoners' assets, garnishing prisoners' wages, and pursuing former prisoners for the cost of their incarceration.
Many have argued that it is not the depositor's fault that the check is drawn on insufficient funds and that charging the depositor in such cases is therefore unreasonable.
When appropriate, the examination should recommend the future use of comprehensive engagement letters, detailing the terms and conditions of the engagement--including the services that are expected to be performed, the basis for charging for those services, the attorneys to be assigned, billing rates and the nature of the working relationship between attorney and company.
The charging of a neutral object by the presence of a charged object, as in the example above, is called charging by induction.