change

(redirected from changeableness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Change

The difference between the closing price on a trading day and the closing price on the previous trading day. The change may be positive or negative. For example, if a stock closes at $11 on Tuesday and $12 on Wednesday, it has a change of +$1. On the other hand, if the stock falls to $10 on Friday, it has a change of -$2. Change is also called net change. See also: Technical Analysis.

change

References in periodicals archive ?
To study the rhetoric of natural phenomena is to study how poets use language and imagery of environmental change and changeableness to evaluate both the impact of natural phenomena upon and the similarity of natural phenomena to the manners and opinions of men and women.
Valuation standards have been difficult to implement because of the complexity, diversity, and changeableness of valuation assignments, property characteristics, and buyer responses.
A prior decision to constrain a later decision-making process can only be conceived as not intrusive on the decision maker's autonomy, given his changeableness, if that prior decision is ever open to revision - for the assumption that the constraints were freely chosen bears on die compatibility of the constraints with present autonomy only if the choice then relates to the constraints now.
They worry about female rhetoric and female changeableness, but also about their own "manliness." Sir Harry Flutter, Lord Medway explains, treats his wife in the way that children treat small animals in their power, because he thinks such behavior makes him look manly' (44).
This postmodern program thus entails championing plurality, difference, changeableness, instability, and lack of hierarchy.
But perhaps the desire of the thing called fame will torment thee.--See how soon everything is forgotten, and look at the chaos of infinite time on each side of [the present], and the emptiness of applause, and the changeableness and want of judgment in those who pretend to give praise, and the narrowness of the space within which it is circumscribed [and be quiet at last].
In the unfinished essay "Opinion," Prior imitates the digressive style and embraces the views of the French essayist on the changeableness of men's minds.