Chancellor of the Exchequer

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Chancellor of the Exchequer

The head of HM Treasury in the United Kingdom. He/she is responsible for advising on and executing economic and fiscal policy in the United Kingdom. Through Inland Revenue and Customs, he/she oversees tax collection.

Chancellor of the Exchequer

the UK government official heading the TREASURY whose main responsibility is the formulation and implementation of the government's economic policy Chancellors of the Exchequer since 1970: A. Barber 1970–74 (Conservative); D. Healey 1974–79 (Labour); G. Howe 1979–83 (Conservative); N. Lawson 1983–89 (Conservative); J. Major 1989–90 (Conservative); N. Lamont 1990–93 (Conservative); K. Clarke 1993–97 (Conservative) and G. Brown 1997-to date (Labour).
References in classic literature ?
Thus, in the midst of the mud and at the heart of the fog, sits the Lord High Chancellor in his High Court of Chancery.
Tangle," says the Lord High Chancellor, latterly something restless under the eloquence of that learned gentleman.
We will proceed with the hearing on Wednesday fortnight," says the Chancellor.
The Chancellor rises; the bar rises; the prisoner is brought forward in a hurry; the man from Shropshire cries, "My lord
In reference," proceeds the Chancellor, still on Jarndyce and Jarndyce, "to the young girl--"
the Chancellor replied, modestly, with downcast eyes.
He didn't pronounce this quite so well as the Chancellor.
This advice appeared good to the future chancellor.
On leaving the convent he entered into the magistracy, became president on the place of his uncle, embraced the cardinal's party, which did not prove want of sagacity, became chancellor, served his Eminence with zeal in his hatred against the queen- mother and his vengeance against Anne of Austria, stimulated the judges in the affair of Calais, encouraged the attempts of M.
For form's sake the chancellor paid a visit to the pieces of furniture named; but he well knew that it was not in a piece of furniture that the queen would place the important letter she had written that day.
When the chancellor had opened and shut twenty times the drawers of the secretaries, it became necessary, whatever hesitation he might experience--it became necessary, I say, to come to the conclusion of the affair; that is to say, to search the queen herself.
said Anne of Austria, drawing herself up to her full height, and fixing her eyes upon the chancellor with an expression almost threatening.