Chancellor of the Exchequer

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Chancellor of the Exchequer

The head of HM Treasury in the United Kingdom. He/she is responsible for advising on and executing economic and fiscal policy in the United Kingdom. Through Inland Revenue and Customs, he/she oversees tax collection.

Chancellor of the Exchequer

the UK government official heading the TREASURY whose main responsibility is the formulation and implementation of the government's economic policy Chancellors of the Exchequer since 1970: A. Barber 1970–74 (Conservative); D. Healey 1974–79 (Labour); G. Howe 1979–83 (Conservative); N. Lawson 1983–89 (Conservative); J. Major 1989–90 (Conservative); N. Lamont 1990–93 (Conservative); K. Clarke 1993–97 (Conservative) and G. Brown 1997-to date (Labour).
References in classic literature ?
Every Chancellor was "in it," for somebody or other, when he was counsel at the bar.
Thus, in the midst of the mud and at the heart of the fog, sits the Lord High Chancellor in his High Court of Chancery.
Tangle," says the Lord High Chancellor, latterly something restless under the eloquence of that learned gentleman.
"Several members of the bar are still to be heard, I believe?" says the Chancellor with a slight smile.
"Morning!" said the little fellow, addressing the remark, in a general sort of way, to the Chancellor and the waiters.
"She's with the Warden, I believe, y'reince!" the Chancellor replied with a low bow.
Just then, a single voice in the distance was understood to shout "A speech from the Chancellor!" "Certainly, my friends!" the Chancellor replied with extraordinary promptitude.
The chancellor entered, half smiling, half blushing.
This advice appeared good to the future chancellor. He conjured the evil spirit with abundance of prayers offered up by the monks.
On leaving the convent he entered into the magistracy, became president on the place of his uncle, embraced the cardinal's party, which did not prove want of sagacity, became chancellor, served his Eminence with zeal in his hatred against the queen- mother and his vengeance against Anne of Austria, stimulated the judges in the affair of Calais, encouraged the attempts of M.
The chancellor rose, and having slowly unrolled the parchment-scroll, proceeded to read it out in a thick and pompous voice, while a subdued rustle and movement among the brothers bespoke the interest with which they followed the proceedings.
The Abbot only sprang forward with shining eyes; but the chancellor and the master hung upon either arm and wrested him back out of danger's way.