block

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Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Stechman, "Comparison of local anaesthetic wound infiltration and bilateral superficial cervical plexus block for thyroid and parathyroid surgery: 2AP2-7," European Journal of Anaesthesiology, vol.
Robin et al., "Analgesic efficacy of bilateral superficial cervical plexus block administered before thyroid surgery under general anesthesia," British Journal of Anaesthesia, vol.
The patients were performed superficial cervical plexus block and selective C5 nerve root block under ultrasound guidance, along with general anesthesia.
Michael et al., "The ultrasound-guided superficial cervical plexus block for anesthesia and analgesia in emergency care settings," American Journal of Emergency Medicine, vol.
[41] 4 hours post-op 8 hours post-op 16 hours post-op 20 hours post-op 24 hours post-op 28 hours post-op 32 hours post-op 36 hours post-op Sindjelic Min Cervical plexus block et al.
Under aseptic precautions bilateral cervical plexus block both superficial and deep block was achieved.
Superficial cervical plexus block is achieved by injecting 2ml of 1%xylocaine and 3ml 0.25% Bupivacaine at the point where external jugular vein crosses the posterior border of Sternocleidomastoid muscle in fan shaped manner after negative aspiration for blood and CSF.
After 10 minutes of combined interscalene and cervical plexus block effect was adequate.
Combined interscalene and cervical plexus block reduced the ICU stay of the patient and no nebulisation required in the ICU stay (14, 15)
In the operating theatre, a left superficial cervical plexus block (5 ml 0.75% ropivacaine + 5 ml 1% lignocaine) and left auriculotemporal nerve block (2.5 ml 0.75% ropivacaine + 2.5 ml 1% lignocaine) were performed.
A right superficial cervical plexus block was performed using 10 ml of 0.5% levobupivacaine.
Our work on the deep cervical plexus block has utilized the vascular access Site ~ Rite [R] 11 7.5 MHz probe, which is designed for depths of 1.5 to 4 cm.