block

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Block

Large quantity of stock or large dollar amount of bonds held or traded. As a rule of thumb, 10,000 shares or more of stock and $200,000 or more worth of bonds would be described as a block.

Block

An exceptionally large amount or value of securities. While there is no specific definition of how many shares constitute a block, most people using the term refer to holding or trading more than 10,000 shares and/or shares worth more than $200,000. Almost invariably, trades of this magnitude involve institutional investors. See also: Block trade, Secondary issue.

block

A large amount of a security, usually 10,000 shares or more.

block

An area bounded by perimeter streets.Many subdivision descriptions employ a subdivision name,and then a block number and a lot number to identify particular properties.The numbers are assigned when the subdivision developer files its plat plan with local authorities.

References in periodicals archive ?
Superficial cervical plexus block is achieved by injecting 2ml of 1%xylocaine and 3ml 0.
Strict vigilance is kept for the Complications of cervical plexus block like intravascular injection/injury to vertebral artery(loss of consciousness, seizures)temporary partial phrenic nerve block (8), CNS toxicity (tinnitus, disorientation, perioral numbness), cardiovascular collapse, recurrent laryngeal nerve blockade (hoarseness of voice), Horner's syndrome (ptosis, miosis, anhydrosis) vagal nerve blockade, Epidural/ subarachnoid (total spinal), brachial nerve plexus blockade, hematoma.
All the patients tolerated the procedure well under bilateral cervical plexus block, except for 3 patients who required small supplemental doses of Propofol 50mg during surgery.
CONCLUSION: Combined interscalene and cervical plexus block can be selected as anaesthetic technique for high risk undergoing shoulder, upper limb surgeries, and clavicular surgeries.
Phrenic, vagus, glossopharyngeal and cervical sympathetic chain nerve involvement have also been reported, although these are associated more with a deep cervical plexus block.
As long as these precautions are in place, we recommend the use of a superficial cervical plexus block, combined with an auriculotemporal nerve block if necessary, for selected patients with dental abcesses requiring urgent incision and drainage, who have difficult airways related to swelling and limited mouth-opening.
Our work on the deep cervical plexus block has utilized the vascular access Site ~ Rite [R] 11 7.
In our experience, the Site ~ Rite [R] II ultrasound also gives satisfactory images of the vertebral artery, even in obese patients where palpation of the traditional landmarks for the deep cervical plexus block are very difficult.