loss

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Related to central vision loss: macular degeneration

Loss

The opposite of gain.

Loss

Extracting less money from a transaction than one put into it. For example, a business' expenses may be $1 million for a year but it may only take in $800,000 in revenue. In such a case, the business has suffered a $200,000 loss. This is not always bad; most businesses lose money in the first few years of operation and this can reduce their tax liability when they do make a profit. However, losses over an extended period of time ultimately result in failure. See also: Gain, Paper Loss, Loss Carryforward, Loss Carryback.

loss

The deficiency of the amount received as opposed to the amount invested in a transaction. Compare gain. See also net loss.

loss

the shortfall between a firm's sales revenues received from the sale of its products and the total costs incurred in producing the firm's output (see BREAK-EVEN ANALYSIS). Losses may be of a temporary nature occasioned by, for example, a downturn in demand (see BUSINESS CYCLE) or due to an exceptional level of expenditures (such as the launch of a series of new products). Short-term losses are usually financed by a firm running down its RESERVES or by an increase in borrowings. Losses which are sustained over time typically arise from a firm's poor competitive position in a market (see COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE), and unless competitiveness can be restored market exit or DIVESTMENT may be the only practical way of remedying the situation. See MARKET SYSTEM.

loss

the difference that arises when a firm's TOTAL REVENUES are less than TOTAL COSTS. In the SHORT RUN, where firms’ total revenues are insufficient to cover VARIABLE COSTS, then they will exit from the market unless they perceive this situation as being temporary. In these circumstances, where firms’ total revenues are sufficient to cover variable costs and make some CONTRIBUTION towards FIXED COSTS, then they will continue to produce despite overall losses. In the LONG RUN, however, unless firms’ revenues are sufficient to cover both variable and fixed costs, then their overall losses will cause them to exit from the market. See MARKET EXIT, LOSS MINIMIZATION, PROFIT-AND-LOSS ACCOUNT.
References in periodicals archive ?
SES is a technique that specifically helps with reading and can be useful for many individuals with low vision, not just those with central vision loss.
As part of a person-centred low vision and rehabilitation package, eccentric viewing (EV) and steady eye strategy (SES) are practical techniques that can help many people with central vision loss use their residual vision more effectively.
In patients with bilateral central vision loss EV training may be a viable tool to help people use what remains of their vision.
Clients with central vision loss may find that scanning in an organized fashion allows for greater speed and efficiency when locating obstacles or people in their path of travel, a place to sit in their crowded assisted living dining room, or an item on a grocery store shelf.
Older adults with central vision loss will also benefit from comprehensive home assessments and environmental modifications to increase safety during mobility tasks.
The college believes that all UK patients with central vision loss should have the opportunity to try the techniques to see if they can benefit.
Winfried Amoaku, of the Royal College of Ophthalmologists, said that eccentric viewing could help some patients with central vision loss "cope with everyday tasks such as identifying coins while out shopping, watching television and reading".
All UK patients with central vision loss should have the opportunity to try eccentric viewing techniques to see if they can benefit," he said.
If your life is affected by central vision loss, they may be able to help you.
Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) leads to central vision loss when looking at something directly ahead.
Older adults with central vision loss caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD) have no problem with accuracy in performing touch screen tasks, according to a study in the October issue of Optometry and Vision Science, official journal of the American Academy of Optometry.

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