Art

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Art

Any visual, creative material. Examples of art include drawings, videos and computer graphics. Art may be bought and sold as an asset (indeed, famous art such as the Mona Lisa is worth many millions of dollars), but it is also used in marketing to help a product appeal to buyers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then there are cases where the motivation for censorship is unclear.
Internet and media censorship are two hot issues that have topped the Turkish public agenda since a major corruption and bribery scandal that implicated various high-ranking government officials and pro-government businessmen on Dec.
Keep Them Reading provides educators the toolkit they need to protect both teacher and students from censorship and thus, protect their academic freedom and the right to freedom of speech.
The Forum said, the KP culture minister had earlier promised a revisit of the cultural policy draft prepared by former ANP government but instead introduced a censorship board bill in KP assembly.
They also stressed the need of providing a legal environment to protect the journalists from the prosecution on the background of their professional work, and to include the censorship in the media sections subjects in the universities.
While he insisted that censorship is "accepted by all," he gave no examples of censorship in the United States.
Their young writers--mostly American, but some from as far away as Malaysia or Myanmar--found censorship disturbing.
He said that this is the first step towards abolishing the censorship system.
Yet, this new censorship scholarship presents a challenge to the more traditional terrain of state censorship.
What's more, under the new regulation, the risks from censorship will be borne fully by producers and creators.
Reporters Without Borders strongly condemns the seizure of the Arabic-language newspaper Al-Sudani by Sudan's National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS), the latest act of media censorship in Sudan.
Bernd Kortlander's introductory chapter begins with Heine, and the effects of censorship on his publishing history, as a way of opening up the topic.