caveats


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caveats

Warnings. Frequently encountered in real estate disclosures or contracts with the words “to the best of the Seller's knowledge”or “but without aid of a structural engineer.”

References in periodicals archive ?
In scenarios where the title deed for a unit has been issued, the customer does not need to register a caveat.
National caveats are restrictions imposed by national governments on their armed forces' operations.
Germany and its caveats has been singled out by Washington for greatest attention, partly because this major member state of the alliance benefited so much from NATO solidarity in the cold war and partly because Berlin's caveats have restricted deployment of Bundeswehr troops to service only in the north of Afghanistan, which sees far less combat than areas along the Pakistan border.
And that brings us to caveat number one: A customer focus means just that.
I am not a defender of either participating whole life or universal life, but I can think of several caveats that should be considered before claiming that the choice of a particular product design is the important driver in a customer's expected yield.
The biggest caveat concerns the Cold War, which, if you're willing to accept it as a war, as Brands does, then brings under the capacious umbrella of Brands's theory everything government took on domestically during the fifties, sixties, seventies, and eighties, from Medicare to environmental protection to the War on Poverty to wage and price controls.
However, we have some caveats regarding the comparison of these two studies.
With that in mind, there is still much to be gained from an understanding of explosive strength training as long as you recognize that you must apply modifications and caveats carefully in order to avoid injury.
There are several caveats to remember when synchronizing data, many of which are detailed in the AnyDay synchronization release notes.
No firm wants the kind of publicity that Bear Stearns and Goldman Sachs got for putting their names on the fairness work on the Cendant debacle (see "The Cendant Deal: Limited Liabilities," page 46, and "The Tropical-Farah Deal: Assertions and Caveats in a Typical Fairness Opinion," page 48).
Printz said, "RSA is bringing in the 'good housekeeping seal of approval' so our membership can feel confident that a lot of the caveats have been removed.
The result is an insightful look at the challenges and caveats facing the outsourcing marketplace in a transitional period.