caveats

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caveats

Warnings. Frequently encountered in real estate disclosures or contracts with the words “to the best of the Seller's knowledge”or “but without aid of a structural engineer.”

References in periodicals archive ?
Most caveats are declared but even these pose challenges for commanders.
After the filing of a caveat by an interested person other than a creditor, the court shallmust not admit a will of the decedent to probate or appoint a personal representative without service of formal notice on the caveator or the caveator's designated agent.
The Court held that the doctrine of caveat emptor applied to defeat the plaintiff's claim since the defective roof was a patent one.
Caveat: Although individuals may be eligible to borrow money from their retirement plans as a result of Hurricane Katrina, their plans might not permit loans.
As a caveat, the escape time distribution for UCNs in an actual experiment may be affected by mechanical vibrations and slight instabilities in the magnetic field.
These caveats notwithstanding, however, "Beyond Geometry" does show us a lot of art from the period, and the memorable art outweighs the forgettable.
According to Professor Matthew Roller, chair of the Department of Classics at The Johns Hopkins University (this writer's alma mater, to toss around another Latin phrase), the formulation eventually settled upon by the editorial staff here -"caveat corvum"--would translate to "let him (or her) beware of the crow." This form, the volitive subjunctive, "is what Latin uses in place of the third-person imperative, which it (more or less) doesn't have," Professor Roller said in an email.
While other static analysis software tools on the market simply detect possible errors, due to division by zero for example, Caveat is able to detail the various cases where this error could occur.
And that's caveat number three: Paying lip service to quality management is to sentence it to an untimely death.
Economic forecasts--oven recycling-specific ones--from the past several months have almost universally been issued with the caveat that predicted prices and consumption patterns are subject to change completely depending on the military situation in Iraq.
However, I have one serious caveat: Although energy systems will surely evolve, trying to guess and then force one certain technology can result in expensive failures.
The National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home Reform (NCCNHR), a Washington, D.C.-based consumer coalition, welcomes the initiative-with the caveat that consumers should not rely solely on this data.