Caucus

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Caucus

A meeting of members of a political party, a faction within a party, or other likeminded individuals. For example, in a legislative chamber, the represented political parties form their own caucuses to present a unified front in public.
References in periodicals archive ?
Co-chairs of the Caucuses have appeared at nearly every event we have asked them to participate.
For an overview of APHA's Caucuses, visit www.apha.org/aphacommunities/caucuses.
In the latter state, where caucuses were held the same day as those in Louisiana, Paul's supporters outnumbered Romney's in the caucuses, with the result that many of the Massachusetts delegates going to Tampa will be Ron Paul supporters even though they will be pledged to Romney owing to his primary victory.
The caucuses should be taken as a less reliable indicator of a candidates' ability to win votes than the primaries on Jan.
More information about the caucuses is available by contacting Billy Johnson at (202) 662-8548 or Mark Reiter at (202) 662-8517.
All proceeds from the conference will be divided equally among the five caucuses for their scholarship endowments.
Democratic party presidential candidates were last night eagerly awaiting the outcome of caucuses in Iowa -the first contest to pick President George Bush's opponent in November's elections.
Campaign workers for the presidential candidates actively contesting the Iowa caucuses are bonded by common denominators like nights on air mattresses, meals of cold pizza, and long hours selling their candidates door-to-door.
"I am fully confident that once this is up and running, the homeland security caucus will be one of the most active and effective caucuses on Capitol Hill," he said.
Examples are small participative religious congregations, regular attendees of Narcotics Anonymous meetings, local participative political caucuses and psychotherapy groups.
As with other Caucuses, a nominal Caucus fee is contributed by active members, however, all of the Liberal women and one man considered a part of the Women's Caucus receive the information about Caucus meetings and activities.
The black caucus's homogeneous partisanship and strong liberalism, for example, mean it holds "a distinct strategic position compared with most caucuses" (p.