Catty

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Catty

A unit of weight in Taiwan approximately equivalent to 600 grams. It is used primarily in the sale of bulk foodstuffs.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the "rout" or sociable gathering attended by ladies and gentlemen of fashion--or "lady-like gentlemen" as Zaarmilla calls them--Miss Ardent openly criticizes these frivolous, mean-spirited creatures who have been cattily attacking the plain dress and unvarnished countenance of a guest.
She is nice, but she has aged" (125), she says to describe the woman, cattily, as if she hopes the man would hear this and reject his current lover (125).
We may think that we already know these characters as stereotypes--the jaded Justice Department attorney reputed to be a loose cannon, the young and beautiful new FBI agent, the cattily ambitious senator's wife--but Horn freshens these familiar character types by making them multifaceted and compellingly human.
MEPs believe Kosovo peace-keepers should "take a more active approach", cattily noting that the rebels "seem to be based in southern Kosovo safe havens, in a region which should be under the control of KFOR".
She couldn't sing and she couldn't act, they cried cattily.
Grave-airs cattily snipes, putting Slipslop in her place, as that saying goes: "`Some Folks might sometimes give their Tongues a liberty; to some people that were their Betters, which did not become them: for her part, she was not used to converse with Servants'" (p.
This obvious bias is more than a little problematic given that The Genius of Shakespeare is an attempt to wrestle Shakespeare free from the grip of (loosely) New Historicism, which Bate repeatedly, cattily, terms the `New Iconoclasm', and more specifically to spar with Gary Taylor's delightfully wry Reinventing Shakespeare (as Bate belatedly admits in a note).
As the Duc de Saint-Simon cattily remarked of the loose-living regent, this may have been more true in vice than it was in virtue.
Some want to purge our neighborhood of the queens flashing fishnetted legs and shouting cattily to the crowd, and of the dykes on bikes, butch gals who wear confidence like a leather jacket.
From here, Bogen shifts both stylistically and chronologically to the cheery decadence of 1920s America, where a class-conscious flapper cattily discriminates between two tennis players--Todd, who is "not one of us," and Ted, "a regular guy, really white.
Featherston and Sloat are compelling, the latter grating on our nerves as much as Katie's as he foolishly introduces a Ouija board to the house then rows with his frazzled girlfriend, cattily telling her to "go hang out with your friend upstairs