Casuistry

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Casuistry

1. In law, the act of applying a rule or principle to a theoretical situation in order to see how it holds up.

2. In law, the act of generalizing an unusual situation in order to form a rule or principle based on it.

3. Derogatory, faulty reasoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
Minerba, the fount of Prometeo's learning and morality, uses casuistical distinctions to hierarchize different levels of vice and blame:
Thus, he had to wrestle with it, to make the kinds of distinctions we have seen: if he had not, then the casuistical door might be thrown open, permitting who knows what to enter.
In place of such a determination Vattel elaborates an array of casuistical rules oriented to harmonizing competing national interests to the extent that this is possible, and these rules constitute the positive law of nations.
self-presentational reiterative mimesis / self-presentational casuistical mimesis) for old-fashioned pairings (e.
5) Godwin's reasoning in London Shadows is equally casuistical, with a similar goal in mind: "Lead [children] into good habits; imbue them with fight principles,--and their lives, in the natural course of things, will be in accordance with these habits and principles.
The casuistical turn of the late scholastics, however, urged them to modify this general scheme.
I thought I could defend my conversation, but it would have been complicated, circuitous, casuistical.
She reviews external and internal evidence for the periodical's audience, and provides a solid genealogy of its casuistical procedures.
60) I describe this kind of analysis in more detail in David Thacher, The Casuistical Turn in Planning Ethics: Lessons from Law and Medicine, 23 J.
17) Creses' casuistical "seeming not to contend" echoes Roxana's earlier advice to Cloria that she give her "seeming consent" to an unwanted proposal of marriage: "which promise cannot binde at all, not onely in respect of your former obligation to Narcissus, but also in regard you are a prisoner, and therefore not tied to any contract made in such a state.
A Study in Seventeenth-Century English Protestant Moral Theology (London: Geoffrey Chapman, 1967); Henry McAdoo, The Structure of Caroline Moral Theology (London: Longmans, 1949); John McNeill, "Casuistry in the Puritan Age," Religion in Life 12 (Winter 1942-43) 76-89; Elliot Rose, Cases of Conscience: Alternatives Open to Recusants and Puritans Under Elizabeth I and James I (New York: Cambridge University, 1975); Thomas Wood, English Casuistical Divinity during the Seventeenth Century (London: SPCK, 1952).
So the second generation developed a religion of the Word--preached and read and discussed--including casuistical moral divinity, household devotional practice, and diary keeping.