Casuistry

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Casuistry

1. In law, the act of applying a rule or principle to a theoretical situation in order to see how it holds up.

2. In law, the act of generalizing an unusual situation in order to form a rule or principle based on it.

3. Derogatory, faulty reasoning.
References in periodicals archive ?
As Jonsen and Toulmin present it, the casuist model of moral philosophy is a loosely organized set of argument strategies and rhetorical moves, and not at all a neatly formulated process of linear inference.
He recommends that by being like the physician the casuist could consider first the concrete problems at hand through a variety of resources and not merely through principles that so often "glide over the facts.
By ignoring the insights of the casuists and rejecting their use of moral discernment for a more principled but grossly simplistic approach to moral issues, we do humanity a disservice that has produced bitter fruit.
identifies Ames and his mentor, Perkins (see supra note 39), as among the most influential Puritan casuists of the period.
This subsequent post-Tridentine casuist tradition--named for its focus on particular moral cases--typically relies upon a distinction between the finis operis and the finis operantis, (21) which as Servais Pinckaers and others have argued is really not operative in the work of Thomas himself.
18) Kopfensteiner's selection of the manualists' casuistry is important: unlike the high casuists of the 16th and 17th century who used their casuistry to open up moral teachings by entertaining a variety of previously unconsidered circumstances, their successors resisted assiduously the influence of circumstances and were convinced that moral truth standards were found in the unchangeable.
This dynamic helps them to see that their hermeneutics is not a circle, but a spiral: casuists facing the horizon of oncoming moral issues determine their solutions as they subsequently determine their communities?
Moreover, communitarianism reveals the particular theory that undergirds casuistry and thereby challenges the casuist to explain the decision-making procedures being used to resolve dilemmas.
BEA bureaucrats would have made good medieval casuists.
And this Consideration salves that common mistake, that some Casuists have taken up (g) even upon this very Consideration, /fol.
Buell points out that the sale of the timber rights in section 5 of "The Bear" reflects Faulkner's awareness "of how those who genuinely value wilderness can become, without fully reasoning through the implications of their acts, coconspirators with those who value it only as a cash crop--and how sometimes, as with Ike McCaslin, they can become such even when they are scrupulous casuists and self-examiners" (189).
They invert the order of authority that the high casuists and early manualists use, acknowledging the authority of the papacy and of Roman dicasteries before and, in fact, sometimes without considering the authority of the argument itself.