cash discount

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Cash discount

An incentive offered to purchasers of a firm's product for payment within a specified time period, such as ten days.

cash discount

a reduction in the total amount of money owed by a customer to a supplier in return for prompt payment. Cash discounts are offered by suppliers as a means of persuading customers to pay for their CREDIT purchases more quickly and thereby improve the supplier's CASH FLOW.

cash discount

see DISCOUNT.
References in periodicals archive ?
4% year-on-year cash reduction in resources and remains challenging,' said an Assembly spokeswoman Picture: Andrew James [c]
The authority said it faces a 43% cash reduction in Government funding from PS120m in 2010/11 to PS68m in 2015/16.
Education bosses at Newcastle Council said this cash reduction, on top of previous Government cuts, would "mean that the capacity to make any further efficiency savings and avoid damaging reductions in services is extremely limited".
One reads: "All teams have been given a 10 per cent cash reduction target and so we need to focus not only on where we can deliver an excellent service with fewer roles but also opportunities to spend less cash.
The rise comes as the authority is facing a 43% cash reduction in Government funding from PS120m in 2010/11 to PS68m in 2015/16.
ILFC Loan Repayment Funds the Largest Single AIG Cash Reduction to Date on FRBNY Loan
To meet that cash reduction new ways to deliver services have been looked at and efficiencies have been made to cut spending.
Heckmann will not be required to issue any additional shares of its stock to compensate for the cash reduction.
Tests show that an 80-90 percent cash reduction rate is possible, meaning the units can start with only a few hundred dollars each day, rather than $1,000 or more.
Despite cash reductions and planned staff cutbacks the number of first-year students rose by 164 on last year's total of 1,527.
Sir Stephen said: "The Au500 million in cash reductions we've seen so far in the voluntary sector are merely the first signs of a gathering tsunami of ill-considered cuts which threatens to decimate the third sector, wreaking havoc on our communities.