CO

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Related to carbon monoxide: carbon monoxide poisoning

CO

The two-character ISO 3166 country code for COLOMBIA.

CO

1. ISO 3166-1 alpha-2 code for the Republic of Colombia. This is the code used in international transactions to and from Colombian bank accounts.

2. ISO 3166-2 geocode for Colombia. This is used as an international standard for shipping to Colombia. Each Colombian department and the capital district have their own codes with the prefix "CO." For example, the code for the Department of Bolivar is ISO 3166-2:CO-BOL.
References in periodicals archive ?
If symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning are suspected, occupants should immediately leave the building, call 999 or seek medical assistance.
Mark Hazelton, LFB's group manager for community safety, said: "It's shocking that the number of carbon monoxide incidents has risen so dramatically in recent years.
The Health and Safety Executive advises that all heating appliances should be serviced annually by an OFTEC Registered Technician to ensure maximum efficiency and to make sure the appliance is not leaking carbon monoxide.
com/7-children-die-carbon-monoxide-poisoning-smoke-inhalation-pennsylvania-fire-274829) Pennsylvania Fire  Kills 7 Children Of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning & Smoke Inhalation
A carbon monoxide alarm should be fitted on every floor of your home (ideally in all the bedrooms) and in every room with a fuel-burning appliance or a flue, even if it's concealed.
The Worcester Fire Department responds to many calls where carbon monoxide detectors have been sounding, giving people early warning to get safely from their homes.
Darroch explains that Gas Safety Week aims to highlight the fact that carbon monoxide poisoning, as well as fires or explosions, can occur when a gas appliance is unsafe, usually because it hasn't been serviced regularly or fitted and maintained properly.
Carbon monoxide poisoning is believed to cause around 50 deaths each year.
Mr Loach also warned carbon monoxide could show that appliances such as boilers or cookers were faulty and more likely to start a fire.
Carbon monoxide has no smell, taste or colour, meaning it is easily inhaled without a victim realising.
The symptoms for carbon monoxide poisoning can be subtle or overt.