Capitalist

(redirected from capitalistic)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Capitalist

A person who believes in or is involved with an economic system in which the means of production are privately held. In capitalism, the most important of the means of production is money, rather than land (as in feudalism) or labor (as in socialism). That is, the ability to raise and use money for the production of goods and services is more important than owning the land from which goods come, or the ability to work in order to create a good or service. As a result, government policies generally target the regulation (or not) of money and its uses rather than those of property and/or labor. While capitalism is often associated with laissez-faire policies, governments in capitalist countries often involve themselves. The appropriate amount of government intervention in a capitalist system remains hotly debated.
References in periodicals archive ?
if, however, one assumes that a capitalist economy's political-social requirements can be met in a variety of ways, and that these ways are determined primarily by the political-social culture that existed before capitalistic industrialization began, then there is no need to believe that deviation from the Anglo-American world is "abnormal."
The importance of consumer credit in the capitalistic system can be measured from the fact that most of the leading capitalistic economies have consumer-debt to GDP ratio in the range of 15%.
These enable PHARSALIA to be presented here as a case study of how white southern plantation owners employed capitalistic methods to cement their ideas of independence.
In his most recent work, The Real Lincoln, DiLorenzo echoed the capitalistic teachings of Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich Hayek, arguing that the U.S.
But first the United States must rid itself of outdated dreams and recognize the delusional lies of a narcissistic capitalistic culture.
Now, a decade later, WWJD has evolved into a capitalistic curiosity.
David Howell has argued that the transition to capitalistic wage-labor could entail the "relative immiseration" of workers, rooted in the loss of control over productive activities, outweighing any rise in the "standard of living."(3) The commodification of labor-power surely had enormous implications for the "level of physical well-being" of the laborers, but Hanley does not specifically examine them.
If we believe that we have a capitalistic free market economy, then how can government regulate the amount charged for a particular service?
The yeoman vision focused on the family and its relation to the land, built on a limited set of social relationships and tied to a particular economic system, lost out to a capitalistic vision of land's relation to production and wealth formation.
But let us assume that I am a constituted individual and, for better or worse, full of ideological contamination bestowed upon me by the patriarchal, capitalistic, bourgeois cinematic and TV-atic apparati.
On the flip side, industrialized, capitalistic economies make the best use of resources.
She discerns three stages: medieval or handicraft production, in which family units worked with their own tools for their own subsistence and for local markets; small commodity production, in which family units and also independent workers labored for distant markets; and capitalistic production, in which the greedy capitalists destroyed the small independent producers and appropriated the means of production.