capitalism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to capitalism: socialism

Capitalism

The economic system in which the means of production is privately held. In capitalism, the most important means of production is money rather than land (as in feudalism) or labor (as in socialism). That is, the ability to raise and use money for the production of goods and services is more important than owning the land from which goods come, or the ability to work in order to create a good or service. As a result, government policies generally target the regulation (or not) of money and its uses rather than those of property and/or labor. While capitalism is often associated with laissez-faire policies, governments often involve themselves in capitalist countries. The appropriate amount of government intervention in a capitalist system remains hotly debated.

capitalism

see PRIVATE-ENTERPRISE ECONOMY
References in periodicals archive ?
The main participants of the seminar (Sebastian Dullien, Hansjorg Herr and Christian Kellermann) have come up with a book Decent Capitalism conceived as a blueprint for a better economic system (still) based on capitalist principles.
In the wake of the 2008 financial meltdown and subsequent acceleration of the boom-bust cycle, many in academia and beyond have increased their calls for the taming, if not outright abolition, of capitalism. In Confucian Capitalism: Shibusawa Eiichi, Business Ethics, and Economic Development in Meiji Japan, John H.
But the most damning critique is that under capitalism, the number of people around the world living on less than $2 a day has been cut nearly in half since the 1980s.
The terms "capital," "capitalist," and "capitalistic" were used for centuries before the term "capitalism" was coined.
Collaboratively compiled and co-edited by Sven Beckert (Laird Bell Professor of History at Harvard University and cofounder of the Program on the Study of Capitalism) and Christine Desan (Leo Gottlieb Professor of Law at Harvard University and cofounder of the Program on the Study of Capitalism), "American Capitalism: New Histories" presents a sampling of cutting-edge research from prominent scholars.
The high standards of Western social justice have not emerged mainly from moral sermonising or even civil society struggles but due to the needs of capitalism for the rule of law.
To build this argument, Rossi offers up a Foucauldian 'history of the present,' outlining the societal transformations that have deepened the links between cities and capitalism. While the book is by no means a strictly historical account of the city-capitalism nexus, Rossi spends significant time grounding what he sees as the 'troubled' and 'ambivalent' condition of today's city-capitalism nexus in its historical context.
He then connects this to global capitalism, as the buying of this security commodity enforces the pacification of workers through security mechanisms, like CCTV, in order to further produce these commodities for profit.
The participants at the conference organized by The Coalition for Inclusive Capitalism which together represent almost US$40t in assets under management were invited to share their perspectives around long-term value creation by answering a set of six live questions.
After the Second World War, the world was practically divided into two competing economic systems, capitalism and socialism.
Here is another story: The hallmark of capitalism is poverty in the midst of plenty.
Whereas Karl Marx assessed capitalism from a materialistic standpoint, Bell uses a spiritual one, namely, desire, adapted from the work of postmodern French philosophers Foucault and Deleuze.