capacity

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Capacity

Credit grantors' measurement of a person's ability to repay loans.

Capacity

The theoretical maximum number of products a company can produce at a given time. For example, an oil pump may have a capacity of X barrels per day, meaning that it cannot produce more than X. Companies rarely operate at full capacity, both to allow themselves leeway in the event of increased demand and because capacity may not be possible at a given time because of worker illness, machinery maintenance, or other reasons.

capacity

the maximum amount of output that a firm is physically capable of producing, at a point in time, given the fullest and most efficient use of its existing plant or plants.

Over time, a firm may adjust its capacity to meet changes in demand and the competitive situation facing it, investing in new plant or extending existing plant to meet an increase in demand, or closing down plant, permanently or temporarily (‘MOTHBALLING’), to meet a situation of OVERCAPACITY.

When preparing a PRODUCTION BUDGET, it is necessary to ensure that the firm has sufficient production capacity to meet planned output levels. A firm's capacity or the capacity of industry in general may be limited by the availability of capital equipment and labour.

The maximum rate of output which the firm can produce will depend upon the capacity of its individual factories which in turn depends upon the capacity of various departments and work stations within each factory See INPUT-OUTPUT CONTROL, PRODUCTION SCHEDULING, PRODUCTION-LINE BALANCING. See CAPACITY UTILIZATION, LIMITING FACTOR, RATIONALIZATION, INDIVISIBILITIES, CAPACITY CONSTRAINED RESOURCE, CAPACITY CONTROL, CAPACITY CUSHION, CAPACITY PLANNING, CAPACITY REQUIREMENTS PLANNING.

capacity

  1. 1the maximum amount of output that a firm or industry is physically capable of producing given the fullest and most efficient use of its existing plant. In microeconomic theory, the concept of full capacity is specifically related to the cost structures of firms and industries. Industry output is maximized (i.e. full capacity is attained) when all firms produce at the minimum point on their long-run average total cost curves (see PERFECT COMPETITION). If firms fail to produce at this point, then the result is EXCESS CAPACITY.
  2. in macroeconomics, capacity refers to POTENTIAL GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT. The percentage relationship of actual output in the economy to capacity (i.e. potential national income) shows capacity utilization. See also MONOPOLISTIC COMPETITION.

capacity

The legal ability of parties to enter into contracts.
• Full capacity. Having unlimited ability to enter into binding contracts of all types.
• Limited capacity. Having the ability to enter into binding contracts for certain things, such as a minor's contracts for necessities, but also having the ability to disaffirm other contracts upon reaching legal age, for example.
• No capacity. Having no ability to enter into contracts, such as one who has been adjudicat- ed as mentally incompetent.

References in periodicals archive ?
CP film should be thin enough to have fast capacitative charging for the working electrode.
These thermoplastic compounds are used in capacitative sensors that are used in industrial and agricultural applications to detect both conductive and nonconductive materials--such as water, glass, plastics and metals--without physical contact.
To meet the special needs and problems that can arise as a result of the increased use of electrosurgery in laparoscopic procedures, Aaron's IDS-300 ESU offers a CutII mode that reduces the maximum peak-to-peak voltage, which helps reduce the risk of capacitative coupling.
when its inductive reactance balances its capacitative reactance.
The impedance of the driving source which tunes the VCO is usually resistive and the VCO"s tuning port is mainly capacitative.
In an investigation of the effect on skin of repeated use of two washing agents, all skin function tests (stratum corneum capacitative resistance, lipids, transepidermal water loss, pH, laser Doppler flow, and skin reddening) were markedly changed after a single wash, and after 1 week further damage was noted (52).
The cutting head incorporates a capacitative sensor which maintains the constant cutting top to material stand-off; the cutting head is also equipped with quick-change lens cartridges.
Allison Engineering Ltd are now marketing in the UK a flow-through electrode that utilizes capacitative flow techniques to detect any change in the flow phase through the pipework.
Hircis, or the high-resolution capacitative imaging sensor, uses twin electrodes to generate its own electric field and measure changes in capacitance on surfaces or edges of machined parts that are caused by raised discontinuities (burrs) and beveled edges (chamfers).
Product Overview II-10 Introduction II-10 Transformers in an Electricity Supply System II-10 Transformers Defined II-10 Types of Transformers II-11 Power Transformers II-11 Distribution Transformers II-11 Role of Tap Changers in Distribution Transformers II-12 Other Transformers II-12 Liquid Immersed Distribution Transformers II-12 Ferro resonant Transformers II-13 Ferrups II-13 Optical Instrument Transformers II-13 Instrument Transformers II-13 Electromagnetic Voltage Transformers II-14 Linear Variable Differential Transformers II-14 Capacitative Voltage Transformers II-15 Transformers < 1kVA II-15 Applications of Transformers II-15 Technologies in Power Systems II-16 Safety Enhancement and Repair of Transformers II-16 On-site repair of Transformers II-16
Contract notice:The Asklepios Klinik Nord - Heidberg needs a capacitative extension and conceptual re - planning of neonatology, neurological early rehabilitation and therapeutic services.