Byline

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Byline

In journalism, the text usually immediately below the headline giving the name, company and/or position of an article's writer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Byline: BYLINE SPACER: delete this box By STEPHEN WHITE
Reich explained that the byline is a relatively new phenomenon in the history of journalism and that newspapers as respected as The New York Times went out of their way to avoid using bylines as a means of underplaying the importance of the individual reporters.
The only bylines on Friday's front page were for stories from The New York Times and The Washington Post.
Louis Post-Dispatch: "We generally publish bylines on wire stories that are roughly 12 inches or more, and particularly stories where the writing is a key element of the story, rather than just a recitation of facts.
It raises the question: Do readers really care about datelines, bylines, stringers and such, or is this just one of those industry family feuds best left in the kitchen?
Johnson explains that the translation of marketing bylines requires a special skill and understanding of a company's desired message.
She graduated to the prestigious Miami Herald, becoming the first teenager to receive a byline for her environmental writing, and is now a regular contributor.
AP policy requires that staffers put their bylines on stories they report that are based on anonymous sources," Silverman's memo, sent Friday in anticipation of the strike, states in part.
Simply stated, one of the very best of them for 2007 is Sylvia Forbes' "Bylines: 2007 Writer's Desk Calendar", a superbly designed and presented weekly planner for writers that is enhanced with 53 stories specifically appropriate to encourage and inspire people to write something every day of every week of every month throughout the year.
Management doesn't want its dirty laundry hanging out in the place of empty bylines."
The bylines have disappeared from Arkansas Democrat-Gazette reports on events following the May 11 shootout in Prairie Grove between a police officer and a 12-year-old boy.
"But as more Western journalists used their bylines and as the story grew more prominent, Barry felt it was time to use his byline, which appeared in the latest editions of the newspaper."