buy

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Buy

To purchase an asset; taking a long position.

Buy

To take ownership of some asset in exchange for some monetary remuneration. Buying may take any of several forms. In a cash purchase, the buyer gives cash or a cash equivalent immediately in exchange for the asset. In a credit sale, the buyer takes ownership immediately in exchange for future payment, often with interest. An example of buying is a simple transaction involving widgets. If the buyer is willing to pay $2 per widget and the seller wishes to sell 100 widgets, then the seller gives to the buyer 100 widgets and, in their place, receives $200. See also: Sale.

buy

A bargain-priced asset. For example, an analyst may feel that a particular firm owns valuable assets overlooked or undervalued by the financial community. In such an instance, the firm's stock is considered a buy.

buy

To purchase a security or other asset. Compare sell.

make

or

buy

the decision by a firm on whether to make a component or product itself or to buy it from an external supplier (see OUTSOURCING). The decision will depend upon the combined production costs and TRANSACTION COSTS of the alternatives. Sometimes a firm may adopt mixes of the two policies, producing some quantity of the product itself and buying the remainder, depending upon the relative costs of the sources and security of supply considerations. See TRANSACTION for a more detailed discussion. See INTERNALIZATION, VERTICAL INTEGRATION.
References in classic literature ?
"Open an account to Hardwell in it; a quarter of all the shares I buy are to be in his name, and a quarter of all the profits I make in dealing in the shares is to be credited to him."
"I'm sure, sister, I've never asked anybody to do anything, only buy things as it 'ud be a pleasure to 'em to have, so as they mightn't go and be spoiled i' strange houses.
We shall make a shift among us to buy what's sufficient for you; though, as Mrs.
G., "if you'll be kind enough to let me speak, i'stead o' taking the words out o' my mouth,--I was going to say, Bessy, as it's fine talking for you to say as you've never asked us to buy anything for you; let me tell you, you ought to have asked us.
I should be so loath for 'em to buy it at the Golden Lion," said the poor woman, her heart swelling, and the tears coming,--"my teapot as I bought when I was married, and to think of its being scratched, and set before the travellers and folks, and my letters on it,--see here, E.
"For one thing," answered Richard, rankling a little, "it won't buy one into the exclusive circles of society." "Oho!
We can't buy one minute of time with cash; if we could, rich people would live longer.
Naturally, they did not have the keen sense of values that I had, who was never given money to buy anything.
Lewis: Let's start with a fact: Nobody buys anything because of a sales process; they buy because of their own buying processes.
Tom Beaudoin, professor of religious studies at Santa Clara University in California, has explored in his book Consuming Faith: Integrating Who We Are With What We Buy (Sheed & Ward) how one can intentionally tie decisions about what one buys with an awareness of what he calls "economic spirituality."
"Gerdau buys foreign steel makers, like Ameristeel or North Star, which are either underperforming or in economic trouble.
If a government buys, of course, tax dollars are used.