buy

(redirected from buying)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

Buy

To purchase an asset; taking a long position.

Buy

To take ownership of some asset in exchange for some monetary remuneration. Buying may take any of several forms. In a cash purchase, the buyer gives cash or a cash equivalent immediately in exchange for the asset. In a credit sale, the buyer takes ownership immediately in exchange for future payment, often with interest. An example of buying is a simple transaction involving widgets. If the buyer is willing to pay $2 per widget and the seller wishes to sell 100 widgets, then the seller gives to the buyer 100 widgets and, in their place, receives $200. See also: Sale.

buy

A bargain-priced asset. For example, an analyst may feel that a particular firm owns valuable assets overlooked or undervalued by the financial community. In such an instance, the firm's stock is considered a buy.

buy

To purchase a security or other asset. Compare sell.

make

or

buy

the decision by a firm on whether to make a component or product itself or to buy it from an external supplier (see OUTSOURCING). The decision will depend upon the combined production costs and TRANSACTION COSTS of the alternatives. Sometimes a firm may adopt mixes of the two policies, producing some quantity of the product itself and buying the remainder, depending upon the relative costs of the sources and security of supply considerations. See TRANSACTION for a more detailed discussion. See INTERNALIZATION, VERTICAL INTEGRATION.
References in periodicals archive ?
Buyers can, and indeed do, move through the early stages of their buying journeys without the need to talk to salespeople.
Buying equity mutual funds is perfect for busy individuals such as working professionals who don't have time to do research on which stocks to buy.
Interviewers asked about cardinal signs of compulsive buying, such as intrusive or senseless impulses to buy, frequent purchases of unneeded or unaffordable items, and shopping for longer periods than intended.
It's more expensive, but you can cap the cost by buying less of it.
The elevator man just told me some big shots in expensive suits were talking about buying United Corporation.
Shareholders owning real estate used by the business can either sell that real estate to the buying company (receiving capital gain treatment with the exception of recapture income) or the shareholders can rent that real estate to the buying entity (where the rents will be taxed to the receiving shareholders at ordinary income rates).
He and other experts advise that chief executives who are contemplating buying a corporate plane should first gain experience chartering aircraft, as Nylen did, joining jet-membership programs that offer a fixed number of flying hours for a fixed rate, or buying fractional shares in a jet.
Buying land to protect it or its contents is nothing new; in the United States, the concept really took off in the 1980s.
"In the 1960s," says dealer Michael Findlay, "collectors were thought of as saints for supporting contemporary art--but also as very clever for buying things for fifteen hundred dollars that were later worth millions."
Many New Life Journal readers understand that buying the healthiest and most sustainable food is the best thing they can do for their families.