buyer's market


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Related to buyer's market: sellers market

Buyer's market

Market in which the supply exceeds the demand, creating lower prices. Antithesis of seller's market.

Buyer's Market

A market situation in which lower prices prevail due to excess supply and a shortage of demand. A buyer's market may occur in one particular sector or across the wider economy. For example, if there are 10 houses in a neighborhood and eight of them are up for sale, it is likely that their prices will race toward the bottom. This means that a prospective homebuyer looking in that area will almost certainly find a good deal on a house. See also: Seller's market.

buyer's market

a MARKET situation characterized by the temporary excess supply of a GOOD or SERVICE often leading to cutthroat price competition. In such markets BUYERS are advantageously placed to obtain price concessions. Compare SELLER'S MARKET.

buyer's market

a SHORT-RUN market situation in which there is EXCESS SUPPLY of goods or services at current prices, which forces prices down to the advantage of the buyer. Compare SELLER'S MARKET.

buyer's market

A market with more properties for sale than can reasonably be expected to be purchased by the available demand. As a result, sellers will have to compete against each other to attract buyers and will usually do so by lowering prices.

References in periodicals archive ?
In other words, don't buy the house just because you are told it's a buyer's market. Do your research first.
The dwindling of oil surpluses and the continued downward pressure on the price of crude oil put them in a difficult position, unleashing the "soft market," which was a prelude to the buyer's market of 1983.
The Indian real estate sector, which is projected to rebound soon after a prolonged period of sluggish growth, continues to be a buyer's market offering investors and end users attractive options, leading builders said on Friday.
Lane County's housing market began shifting from a buyer's market to a seller's market in the summer of 2012.
"All factors come into play even more in a buyer's market such as the curb appeal ...
One of the most profound impacts of the Wall Street crisis on New York City's real estate market is the sudden and dramatic emergence of the new buyer's market. Virtually overnight, the advantage has shifted from sellers, who once presided over lightning-fast sales and bidding wars, to buyers, who now dictate every aspect of the transaction from the closing date to the discount off the asking price.
Showrooms are awash with new models and it is very much a buyer's market as manufacturers have invested billions in a bid to outdo each other.
It is a buyer's market, but to become a buyer many people need to sell first - and the key here is to be flexible, in the sure knowledge that as a buyer you can negotiate a good purchase price.
"There is a clear shift from a seller's market to a buyer's market," Williams says.
"With so many companies now offering to supply gas and electric, it is a buyer's market and simply by changing suppliers, which these days is a relatively simple process, people could make significant savings."
The Buyer's Market's summer show grew by almost 10 percent from 2000 to 2002, while its winter show remained stable.
All of which means that it's a buyer's market out there, so don't even think about paying showroom prices.