Burn

(redirected from burned)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to burned: Burned tongue

Burn

1. In printing, the time at which an image is put on a plate.

2. In film, a ghost of an image that remains after the image has disappeared.
References in periodicals archive ?
1 -- color) The Day Fire burned out of control on Wednesday as it headed toward the Pyramid Lake recreation area.
One of the largest fires in Colorado's history, the 2002 Hayman Fire burned all but a few hundred of the 8,000 acres surrounding the Cheesman Reservoir, a primary watershed for the Denver area.
From 1980 to 1990, Rocketdyne opened another burn area where workers burned smaller amounts of materials and shot armor-penetrating bullets into canisters to release the gases.
But even the materials set aside for waste-to-energy purposes will not be burned in a furnace.
Now that Karabeyoglu had figured out why the pentane in the Air Force fuel burned so quickly, he and his colleagues wondered whether they could find a related material that burns as fast but is solid at room temperature.
At low elevations, charred trunks today stand sentinel on steep slopes where fire burned very hot, consuming every needle and pine cone.
We remove a thin, almost transparent strip of skin from a part of the body that isn't burned," explains Dr.
Everybody has been made to believe the contamination stayed on site, but when you look at the gallons and gallons of materials that were burned and the clouds moved off site, I think the public has been misled,'' said Mary Weisbrock of Save Open Space.
Native Americans burned woodlands to promote desirable plant growth and to drive game.
The recyclers' waste might have burned cooler, contained more plastics that were especially chlorine-rich, or been seeded with more dioxin-forming catalysts such as copper.
It burned about 24,000 acres from the hills around Simi Valley to the outskirts of Old Agoura.
Historically, wildfires have burned forests and grasslands across the country, and today they remain an omnipresent threat.