Bulletin

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Bulletin

A brief report of news. For example, a company may issue a bulletin on hiring a new CEO. See also: Press release.
References in classic literature ?
The details of the undertaking were published in full in the bulletins of the Geographical Society of Paris; a remarkable article appeared in the Nouvelles Annales des Voyages, de la Geographie, de l'Histoire, et de l'Archaeologie de M.
Geoffrey's face darkened as he read the third bulletin.
There is also a universal government bulletin, in which are listed and precisely described everything which the commonwealth has for sale.
They were: Wickson's "California Fruits," Wickson's "California Vegetables," Brooks' "Fertilizers," Watson's "Farm Poultry," King's "Irrigation and Drainage," Kropotkin's "Fields, Factories and Workshops," and Farmer's Bulletin No.
There was a new bulletin, but what it said he did not gather except that it concerned the Barbarossa.
But five days after the article in the bulletin of the Geographical Society appeared, the demand began to subside: "Phileas Fogg" declined.
Pierre took that letter, and Rostopchin also gave him the Emperor's appeal to Moscow, which had just been printed, the last army orders, and his own most recent bulletin.
On the morning when the final results of all the examina- tions were to be posted on the bulletin board at Queen's, Anne and Jane walked down the street together.
The king, shut up in his own apartment, dispatched his nurse every hour to Mazarin's chamber, with orders to bring him back the exact bulletin of the cardinal's state.
When, at Schonbrunn, on May 13, 1809, Napoleon wrote the bulletin addressed to the Grand Army, then the masters of Vienna, in which he said that like Medea, the Austrian princes had slain their children with their own hands; Genestas, who had been recently made a captain, did not wish to compromise his newly conferred dignity by asking who Medea was; he relied upon Napoleon's character, and felt quite sure that the Emperor was incapable of making any announcement not in proper form to the Grand Army and the House of Austria.
Brooke sent a bulletin every day, and as the head of the family, Meg insisted on reading the dispatches, which grew more cheerful as the week passed.
The matrons dropped off one by one, with the exception of six or eight particular friends, who had determined to stop all night; the lights in the houses gradually disappeared; the last bulletin was issued that Mrs Kenwigs was as well as could be expected; and the whole family were left to their repose.