bear

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Bear

An investor who believes a stock or the overall market will decline. A bear market is a prolonged period of falling stock prices, usually by 20% or more. Related: bull.

Bear

An investor who believes, for any technical or fundamental reason, that a security or the broader market will decline significantly. A bear takes the appropriate steps to limit losses during the period that they believe that the security will decline. They may sell their long positions or short sell the security to profit from the decline in price. See also: Bull.

bear

An investor who believes a security or some other asset or the security markets in general will follow a broad downward path. An investor can often be a bear on a particular security but not on the general market and vice versa. Compare bull.

bear

a person who sells a financial security (stock, share, foreign currency, etc.) in expectation that its market price is likely to fall. See SPECULATION. Compare BULL.

bear

a person who expects future prices in a STOCK EXCHANGE or COMMODITY MARKET to fall and who seeks to make money by selling shares or commodities. Compare BULL. See SPOT MARKET, FUTURES MARKET, BEAR MARKET.
References in periodicals archive ?
"The full weight of the law must be brought to bear in this case."
With the full strength of his army and navy now brought to bear on the Greek positions, Xerxes struck.
This means the recruiting firm has become "creative," looking for board candidates among service providers to the insurance industry, namely people who understand the forms of risk and the degree of competitive pressures being brought to bear on the industry from other financial services groups, he said.
Elsewhere, too, Quitslund has brought to bear on the FQ other new or underutilized primary sources, for example, Bruno's Spaccio, Batman vppon Bartholome, Christoforo Landino's two works on the Aeneid, and the Symposium's translators, imitators, and commentators--Ficino, Leone Ebreo, and Louis le Roy.
Despite all the personal material brought to bear on her work here, the question remains whether the show will shed new light on Diane Arbus's puzzling suicide--a story that needs to be told with the same stunning lack of schadenfreude she brought to her photographs.
It is not, in fact, very illuminating about Talbott, but it throws an intriguing new light on the psychological devices that his old college friend, Bill Clinton, brought to bear in handling Russia's mercurial leader.
"The Football Association and the Premier League, as well as the Football League, have their own deals with ITV and there must be pressure brought to bear from those bodies.
He warned: "The full force of the law will be brought to bear on anyone found supplying alcoholic drink to juveniles."
There is only one way of defusing the Lakshmi Mittal row and that is for the Government to reveal exactly who knew what and when, and what influence was brought to bear.
A Eurotunnel spokesman said: "We hope it sends a powerful message that if they attempt to breach the security, full legal action will be brought to bear."
The USGS offers a number of strong resources for the biomedical research community, the need for which will increase as we move into an era of multidisciplinary research where numerous scientific fields must be brought to bear on environmental health issues.
According to Taylor, he let the agency know that NADC's east coast members were prepared to offer "a wealth of technical experience and sophisticated equipment that could be brought to bear in New York City and Arlington, Va., to assist in urban search and rescue and site clearance phases of these two disaster sites."